(Pocket-lint) - Netflix has reverted to full quality video streams in the UK as the nation continues its emergence from lockdown.

Like almost all other streaming services, it had reduced its bitrates from the end of March in order to avoid overloading networks across Europe and beyond. However, data released in May showed that network capacity could cope with increased demand, even during the busiest periods. And, that has now resulted in Netflix being the first to switch its unrestricted service back on.

During the last few months, Netflix had throttled performance to stream at a maximum of 7.62Mbps. It was still possible to get 4K HDR pictures and Dolby Atmos surround sound, but quality was slightly curbed.

As reported by Forbes, it has now reverted to its pre-lockdown peak bandwidth of 15.25Mbps.

The original self-imposed limiting measures were brought about when the European Union and others at governmental level in several countries were concerned that the combination of working from home, homeschooling, plus entertainment and gaming, could result in dramatic slow down of internet speeds. But, in May, Ofcom published its home broadband performance report which found that download and upload speeds only fell by an average of two and one per cent respectively, after the UK's lockdown measures were introduced.

Even latency was only affected by around two per cent - which was barely noticeable for the vast amount of internet users.

It also reported that BT saw just a 35 to 60 per cent rise in traffic use during weekdays, which it said was still well below the average evening peak time use before lockdown.

Even Netflix download speeds specifically were seen to have fallen by just three per cent, even during its busiest periods.

So, essentially, the UK's internet networks were proved to be well set to handle an return to pre-lockdown bitrates and video quality from streaming services - with Netflix the first to normal.

Indeed, some are reporting that their Netflix streams have already been restored.

Now we wait to see if Disney+, Amazon Prime Video and other streaming services will follow.

Writing by Rik Henderson.