With EE flicking the switch on its new 5G service, the BBC has taken the opportunity to conduct the UK's first live broadcast using the new service.

Working with BT, the corporation connected its camera to a 5G modem to allow it to transmit over the new network, allowing the BBC's tech reporter Rory Cellan-Jones to file his story live on BBC Breakfast.

The BBC reports that it also experimented with different compression formats for the transmission, sending the feed into New Broadcasting House for distribution. It's a short clip and the BBC reflects on our experience with 5G - that it's patchy rather than being blanket coverage - but it does highlight the potential of faster data connections. 

Live broadcasts play a big part in much of modern television and while it has been easy to use low-resolution livestreaming solutions from a mobile device, the fact that you can use 5G to give you broadcast quality results could potentially make it simpler and easier. It should make for easy rapid deployment to cover breaking news in areas - as long as there's a 5G connection of course.

While 4G will allow you to do that same, you've always needed multiple 4G connections to get the broadcast to work - whereas on 5G only one connection was needed.

Matthew Postgate from the BBC said: "5G is a hugely interesting area for us to explore, with potential to reduce the cost and complexity of outside broadcasts, and as a way of delivering content to audiences in the future. The internet will play a bigger role in broadcasting and we're pioneering the techniques, standards and ways of working to truly take advantage of it."

For everyone else, 5G is now available from EE if you want to be one of the first to adopt the new technology. The coverage is slightly limited in these early days, but the roll-out across major cities will be taking place through 2019 and 2020. 

You can read all about 5G EE here, or you can read up on our first experiences of the new service.