Panasonic has a full line-up of new televisions for 2018, investing both in expanding its OLED offering, as well as delivering a range of LED TVs too.

That sees the number of OLED sets expand, while there are four major divisions in the 4K HDR LED sets. There are Full HD TVs too, but we're not including those in this comparison.

It's also worth noting that Panasonic's numbering is a little convoluted, with different model numbers in different regions, regional exclusives as well as retailer exclusives and variation on the sizes available in different regions. We'll aim to clarify those discrepancies as we encounter them.

One thing to note on model numbering if you're browsing Panasonic TVs: F equals 2018 models, E equals 2017 models.

Pocket-lintPanasonic 4K HDR TVs for 2018 image 1
  • Screen sizes: 77in
  • OLED, 3840 x 2160 pixels, HDR
  • Price: £19,999 

The EZ1002 (also called EZ1000) saw Panasonic's return to OLED in 2017. This model remains in the 2018 line-up, but it's only going to be available in one size - 77 inches. Big OLED TVs cost a lot, so you're looking at around £20k for this model.

The EZ1002 has won a wide range of acclaim. Panasonic has been happy to tell people that this set has been widely adopted in Hollywood, with a number of production houses using it in part of their workflow. 

That's because the EZ1000 handles detail wonderfully on its 4K OLED panel, powered by Panasonic's HCX chip. Impressive blacks meet vibrancy in colours and it carries THX certification - with those professional users saying that it closely matches their studio reference monitors - high praise indeed.

Alongside the slim design there's a blade soundbar attached to the stand, so this is very much the complete entertainment package. There's no Dolby Vision support, but HDR10+ will be arriving with a software update for this model.

However the EZ1002, while it remains part of the line-up, is out-performed by the new FZ952, available in smaller sizes. This might be a stellar TV, but the new model might just be a OLED superstar you want.

Pocket-lintPanasonic 4k Hdr Tvs For 2018 image 2
  • Screen sizes: 55in, 65in
  • OLED, 3840 x 2160 pixels, HDR
  • Price: £TBC 

A newer panel makes for a brighter OLED TV and along with that HCX processor, that ability to boost those HDR visuals beyond the older EZ1002. Note that the FZ952 will be called the FZ950 in some regions (like the US). 

The new FZ950 is the flagship in waiting, but more likely to be the model that OLED purists opt for, coming in 55 and 65-inch sizes, so better suited to smaller homes (and smaller wallets).

It also carries that blade speaker across the bottom, but this time it's tuned by Technics, promising to give you slightly better sound quality than the EZ1002, although the 80W output retains the same power. 

There's support for HDR10+ and HLG, with Panasonic opting not to support Dolby Vision on any of its TVs. This TV uses the HCX processor, again promising outstanding picture quality. From what we've already seen, this is an outstanding OLED TV and adding Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa support will make it more popular.

Pocket-lintPanasonic 4k Hdr Tvs For 2018 image 3
  • Screen sizes: 55in, 65in
  • OLED, 3840 x 2160 pixels, HDR
  • Price: £TBC 

Leaving the soundbar out of the equation gives you with a slim TV with a more conventional stand, perfect for pairing with an existing sound system.

The Panasonic FZ802 OLED (called FZ800 in some regions) offers all the same technologies as the FZ952 we mentioned above, so will give you the same picture quality from 55 or 65-inch displays.

It will also support the likes the HDR10+ and HLG. The same HCX processor drives the visuals with Panasonic's LUT (look up tables) giving more accurate reference points to keep the visuals accurate.

The Panasonic FZ802 OLED is likely to be the cheapest entry point into OLED from the company, so we suspect it will be a popular choice for those looking for a high-end 2018 TV. Again, Google Assistant and Alexa support will be included.

Pocket-lintPanasonic 4k Hdr Tvs For 2018 image 4
  • Screen sizes: 49in, 55in, 65in, 75in
  • LED, 3840 x 2160 pixels, HDR, edge lit
  • Price: £TBC 

Panasonic's top-of-the-range LED TV is the FX750 (called the FX780 in some regions). This takes the top spot in a number of areas, but the biggest is in quality for an LED TV. 

Firstly, this is an edge-lit LED LCD panel, as there are no direct-lit TV options in Panasonic's 2018 LED collection (you'll want Sony TVs for that). But there's improved local dimming control on this model, using the digital panel as well as the LEDs to better control the light. This was a feature of the EX750 in 2017 and we found it to be really effective in avoiding some of the haloing or banding that you'd sometimes expect on LED TVs.

This TV also carries the HCX chip that you get in Panasonic's OLED TVs. As such, Panasonic is referring to it as a 4K Pro TV. It also has a brighter panel that the other LED models, so will be able to better deliver an HDR punch. It has a native 100Hz panel to reduce blur. 

Aside from the technical level of this TV, the design looks like the OLED models too. Using the "Art & Interior Glass" design, the panel is slim glass through the body, with a similar stand design to the FZ802 OLED model. 

We have high hopes for this LED model, it sounds a cut above the rest.

Pocket-lintPanasonic 4k Hdr Tvs For 2018 image 5
  • Screen sizes: 49in, 55in, 65in
  • LED, 3840 x 2160 pixels, HDR, edge lit
  • Price: £TBC

Look at the FX740 and the FX750 and you'd be forgiven for thinking they're the same TV. There's a reason for that, because they share the same "Art & Interior Glass" design. That results in a skinny glass screen that looks very close to Panasonic's OLED TV, the FZ802. 

The premium looks are really just applied to a TV that's the same spec as the FX700, Panasonic's intermediate level TV. That means you're getting an LED panel with the benefits of that more advanced dimming system found on the FX750.

What you don't get, however, is the HCX processor, so this model won't handle the detail and HDR quite as well as the top model in the LED range. This is also a 50Hz panel, again, so doesn't quite have the blur-reduction skills of the FX750.

In the UK, the FX740 model will be exclusive to Currys PC World.

Pocket-lintPanasonic 4k Hdr Tvs For 2018 image 6
  • Screen sizes: 49in, 55in, 65in
  • LED, 3840 x 2160 pixels, HDR, edge lit
  • Price: £TBC 

The FX700 is Panasonic's proper intermediate 4K HDR TV. It carries with it a similar specification to the entry-point TV, the FX600, but it offers the better dimming controls we've mentioned from the FX750.

What it doesn't get is the HCX processor that the top models offer, so it won't be as well equipped for dealing with detail or blur as this is a 50Hz panel.

The design of the TV uses premium materials with a dark metallic finish and it uses Panasonic's switch stand design, giving you adjustable feet so you can relocate them to cater for the size of your TV stand.

All these models support HDR10+ and HLG for HDR coverage, while offering a Freeview Play EPG for those in the UK.

Pocket-lintPanasonic 4k Hdr Tvs For 2018 image 7
  • Screen sizes: 49in, 55in, 65in
  • LED, 3840 x 2160 pixels, HDR, edge lit
  • Price: £TBC

The FX650 is a variant of the FX600, sitting at the entry-point to Panasonic's 4K HDR TVs. The design isn't as fancy as the FX700 and there isn't the same dimming control as you get on all the higher models, so again, the picture performance won't be as advanced. That is also a 50Hz panel.

The feet on this model can be repositioned though, once again giving you some flexibility in how you position your TV on a stand.

You're still getting a 4K HDR TV however, with all the connected smart TV skills and Freeview Play. 

  • Screen sizes: 43in, 49in, 55in, 65in
  • LED, 3840 x 2160 pixels, HDR, edge lit
  • Price: £TBC 

This is the entry point and also a small 4K HDR TV. At 43-inches there's no need for those feet to move around so they are fixed in place, but it will also be available in larger sizes.

As with the FX650 above, this is still a fully packed TV, but it doesn't offer all the skills you'll find higher up the range.

It’s a 50Hz panel with a 4K resolution and supporting HDR, but it doesn’t have the advanced dimming control or picture processing that you get higher up the line.