(Pocket-lint) - LG’s next flagship smartphone won't have an alphanumeric name. Instead, the device will be called the LG Velvet.

So, after eight generations of G phones, LG wants to do something new. And it thinks a name change is what's needed. The company described this sort of thinking as a "new branding strategy" in its announcement:

"LG Electronics is answering the challenge by embarking on a new product roadmap that will emphasize distinctive designs and tactile”elegance to set itself apart . . . LG Velvet will be the first device to implement the company’s new branding strategy for its mobile devices, moving away from alphanumerical designations in favor of familiar and expressive names that will help the consumer capture the essence of the device best suited for his or her personality and ever-changing trends."

The company also said the Velvet name is meant to “evoke images of lustrous smoothness and premium softness". 

Yes, that's a lot of corporate PR speak, if you ask us. But we also can't help but wonder if the back of the phone will somehow be cloth-based or have some sort of texture. The company's press releases also hint that the phone will be “pleasing to touch" - even emphasising that "smoothness" and "softness" will be two key characteristics of the new phone.

LG

Keep in mind LG recently teased the phone's all-new design. It shared a render of a phone with a “raindrop” rear camera setup in the upper-left corner. It has three cameras and an LED flash in descending order by size. LG said this is "meant to evoke images of falling raindrops".

But LG also said two of the phone's lenses "lie seamlessly under the smooth glass" and that it has a "tactilely pleasing design layout". It also isn't obvious in LG's render that the new phone is actually soft in any way. If anything, it appears to have a brushed metal back. It's hard to tell.

Either way, LG seems confident that its next phone's new look - coupled with this new LG Velvelt re-branding - will surely resonate with consumers. But, mostly, we think it's just trying to establish a clearer brand identity to help it better rival the likes of Samsung and OnePlus.  

Writing by Maggie Tillman.