Huawei isn't letting Best Buy's decision to drop its phones, let alone pressure from the US government, stop it from planning its next device.

The world’s third-biggest smartphone maker, which recently launched its Mate 10 Pro and is about to debut its upcoming P20 lineup, is considering making a new mobile phone focused on running blockchain-based apps, according to Bloomberg. It wants to license Sirin Labs’ operating system, Sirin OS, to run blockchain apps alongside Android. But the two companies are reportedly only talking at this point.

If those talks pan out, and a deal is officially put in place, Huawei would become the first major smartphone maker to embrace blockchain, a technology often described as a "decentralised ledger" used to record cryptocurrency transactions. While its first use cases are financial, it can also solve problems and create new opportunities in a range of industries from healthcare to supply chain management.

Consider blockchain to be a tamper-proof record, spread across among multiple parties, with time-stamped transactions. Overall, it promises greater security and lower costs than traditional databases. Huawei wants Sirin Labs, which is also developing a blockchain smartphone, to help it bring blockchain to the masses in a secure way, according to a Sirin Labs’ Telegram chat group that Bloomberg obtained.

Sirin Labs aims to sell its blockchain phone, called Finney, for about $1,000 after the second half of this year and currently has pre-orders for it open. The phone is expected to be powered by Sirin OS, which features an embedded cold storage crypto wallet and a system that auto-converts fiat money to digital tokens, which are needed to run different blockchain apps. There's no word yet on UK pricing or availability.

Would you buy a blockchain phone - if not from Sirin Labs but Huawei?

ee.co.uk - PAY MONTHLY PHONES The Samsung Galaxy S10+ is now available on EE who have been awarded the UK’s best network for the fifth year running. RootMetrics tested the four UK networks and EE was faster and more reliable than all of them, with better data performance. Their network has come a long way since they launched in 2012. Back then they had 11 UK cities covered by 4G. Today they cover most of the UK’s land mass, thanks to 19,000 state-of-the-art 4G sites. They’ve got faster, too – from 50Mbps to a maximum speed of 400Mbps. And they’re soon to experience even greater possibilities with the launch of 5G.

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