The new iOS, set to be unveiled at WWDC in June, has always been expected to have major changes, with long time Apple designer Jonathan Ive taking the design reins. Now, 9to5mac's Mark Gurman tells all ahead of the June keynote, saying the new interface within iOS 7 will be very flat, like Windows Phone. The flat design will streamline the interface, doing away with the skeuomorphic elements found within several core Apple apps.

The flat design will retain the easiness of iOS, according to Gurman's sources, who have been spot on in the past. There will be no new learning curve and several core fundamentals of iOS will remain the same, including the Lock and Home screens. Several of Apple's native apps will get new icons and redesigned tool bars, tab bars and other features in the update. 

Furthermore, Apple will be increasing productivity with iOS 7 by implementing more information at a glance. According to the report, one idea Apple is toying with is when a finger is swiped on the left or right side of the screen, information such as that provided within Notification Center will appear.

Industry watchers have noted that it's time for Apple to shake up iOS, as it has retained many of the same elements since the original version. While new features do come in every iteration many have hoped for more features, and now it sounds like Apple might be delivering the biggest update to iOS yet.

Apple has already hinted at flatter design changes when it put out the update to its Podcasts app earlier this spring. Ive is pushing iOS to new bounds, somewhere the former iOS chief Scott Forstall wouldn't take the mobile operating system.

It's not clear when Apple will release iOS 7 to the masses, but a WWDC unveil alongside the new version of OS X sounds very likely. iOS 6 was released last autumn, so history would tell us that should mean the same for the new version.

ee.co.uk - PAY MONTHLY PHONES The Samsung Galaxy S10+ is now available on EE who have been awarded the UK’s best network for the fifth year running. RootMetrics tested the four UK networks and EE was faster and more reliable than all of them, with better data performance. Their network has come a long way since they launched in 2012. Back then they had 11 UK cities covered by 4G. Today they cover most of the UK’s land mass, thanks to 19,000 state-of-the-art 4G sites. They’ve got faster, too – from 50Mbps to a maximum speed of 400Mbps. And they’re soon to experience even greater possibilities with the launch of 5G.