The weirdest and wackiest mobile phones you won't admit you owned

Looked more like a calucalator than a phone, but it was 2006.

(image credit: Samsung)

A colab between Bang & Olufsen and Samsung, this had a price tag of $2,000. Expensive even by today's standards. 

(image credit: Bang & Olufsen)

Before the Serenata was a desk based phone from B&O that featured an iPod-style scroll wheel. 

(image credit: Bang & Olufsen)

Want your phone to look like a "compact"? No problem. Oh, and of course you want your number pad in a circle like the 1950s don't you?

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Who doesn't need a phone designed to look like a pen crossed with a laser pointer? This gem had a six day battery life and a 0.3 megapixel camera. 

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The Flex didn't flex, but it was pretty innovative for its time. Sadly, it never caught on, with many finding it too large and too expensive.

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Called the Lobster phone because it looked like a lobster claw, it had a DAB tuner and you could watch TV on its tiny screen.

(image credit: Virgin Mobile)

Before Windows Phone, Microsoft launched the Kin. A huge flop, it felt at the time as if it was only on sale for a matter of weeks before being pulled.

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It's hip to be square. The Flipout featured a swivel keyboard, but nobody could work out why they needed it, so it didn't hang around for long. 

(image credit: Motorola)

A great phone that got a colourful makeover to make sure you were noticed when you got this out your pocket in the 1990s. 

(image credit: Motorola)

Designed to look like a lipstick, it was best if you had all your contacts stored so you didn't have enter them by scrolling as there was no numberpad.

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There was a time when no two Nokia phones looked alike. The 7600 was the first 3G phone from the company and was a cracker, if a little odd.

(image credit: Nokia)

Coming at a time when a 3.5-inch display was unheard of, this one featured the ability to show things like spreadsheets. 

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More of a PDA akin to Psion and BlackBerry, the 7710 even came wth a stylus to help you navigate that huge screen. 

(image credit: Nokia)

The N93 was all about video. It allowed you to capture 30 frames a second with its 3.2 megapixel camera and play it back on the 2.4-inch screen. 

(image credit: Nokia)

Wanted a gaming phone? Nokia had you covered with the N-Gage a gaming-focused smartphone that was for anyone who didn't want a Nintendo 3DS.

(image credit: Nokia)

There was a time that whatever LG did, Samsung did too. The Round was its answer to the G Flex.

(image credit: Samsung)

Launched at a time when all we wanted was a music player that fitted in a pocket, the Juke was a portable jukebox as well as phone.

(image credit: Samsung)

A tie-in with the film that was really designed to be a collectors item for the fans. As such, it wasn't the greatest of phones. 

(image credit: Samsung)

It was all about fashion when it came to the Xelibri range, and that included the price. However, users wanted tech and so the range soon became a flop.

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This was a phone you could wear on your wrist. Years ahead of the Apple Watch, this literally was a phone that came with a wrist strap.

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Looking like a bloated USB stick, this followed the same design approach as many of the Nokia handsets that presumed you only called your contacts.

(image credit: Toshiba)

Two screens are better than one right? Yota believed that meant an E-Ink display on the rear to read ebooks and the like. 

(image credit: Yotaphone)

With a growing focus on photography, phones have embraced some interesting ideas over the years. The 9 PureView came with five cameras on its rear.

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Taking a different approach to the traditional clamshell design. The stylish fashion-focused swivelshell was very satisfying to play with. 

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The V100 was all about business and making sure you got that email or text message on the go. 

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This Palm phone was so small it was very easy to pop in a pocket. However, it also made a tiny mark on consumers: they didn't buy it.

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Many have played with the idea of two screens. It didn't work, but others are still trying to perfect the idea of a rear screen for selfies.

(image credit: Pocket-lint)

Another early adopter, this time you got two screens side-by-side. Of course, today phone makers are opting for one giant screen that folds.

(image credit: Pocket-lint)