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(Pocket-lint) - In collaboration with Intel, Dell has unveiled its vision of the future for sustainable, reusable and repairable laptop design.

The laptop is called Concept Luna, and if Dell uses the ideas presented, it could reduce the computers carbon footprint by up to 50 per cent, when compared with its current products.

Dell started by reducing the raw materials and managed to shrink the motherboard down 75 per cent smaller, with 20 per cent fewer components used. 

It also made the laptop more efficient, and in doing so, can utilise smaller deep-cycle batteries. The idea is that the batteries will be able to out-live the laptop and can be harvested and reused in future laptops, something that's not feasible with today's batteries.

Dell reduced the number of screws down to just four, allowing the laptop to be opened up for repair much more easily and quickly by both its engineers and those wishing to tinker at home.

The materials used, too, are more eco-friendly. The aluminium shell is processed by hydropower and uses a stamped design for less wastage. Even the PCB has seen a redesign, using a flax fibre base and a water-soluble polymer for the glue. This will make components much easier to recycle.

Dell wants to increase the modularity of the components within the laptop, allowing for swapping across different devices whether they are faulty or just in need of an upgrade. This would reduce waste due to incompatibilities and make DIY repair far easier than current designs.

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It's just a concept at this stage, but Dell plans to take the best ideas from Concept Luna and implement them into its future products. With the right-to-repair movement gaining traction globally, the approach displayed here is the kind of thing we're expecting to see become commonplace with laptop manufacturers.

Writing by Luke Baker.