Pocket-lint is supported by its readers. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more

(Pocket-lint) - Bungie, the developer behind Destiny and the original creator of Halo, has announced it will be acquired by Sony Interactive Entertainment in a deal worth $3.6 billion.

Bungie said it will "continue to independently publish and creatively develop our games", according to CEO Pete Parsons in a blog post. "We have found a partner who unconditionally supports us in all we are and who wants to accelerate our vision to create generation-spanning entertainment, all while preserving the creative independence that beats in Bungie’s heart", Parsons added.

-

In fact, Bungie has promised its fans it will continue to be a multiplatform studio and publisher, sitting independently alongside PlayStation Studios.

Sony's acquisition of Bungie comes days after Microsoft announced its plans to acquire Activision Blizzard in a deal worth $68.7 billion. Microsoft was alarmingly vague at first about whether Call of Duty and other franchises would become Xbox exclusives. Only after much backlash and potential problems with regulators did it later promise to honor existing deals with Sony. Bungie is taking a different approach, admitting flat out that future games will not become PlayStation exclusives. "No. We want the worlds we are creating to extend to anywhere people play games", Bungie said on a FAQ page.

"We will continue to be self-published, creatively independent, and we will continue to drive one, unified Bungie community", Bungie added.

In that FAQ, Bungie also detailed how the acquisition will affect one of its more popular games, Destiny 2. It answered questions about whether crossplay will remain unchanged, if the Destiny 2 experience on non-PlayStation platforms will be impacted, and more. So be sure to check out that page for all nitty-gritty. But it sounds like fans of the mythic sci-fi world have nothing to worry about

Writing by Maggie Tillman. Editing by Rik Henderson.