(Pocket-lint) - Nintendo's become awfully fond of dropping its news out of the blue in the last couple of years, partly as a way to stop people speculating too wildly about when they'll be announcing long-awaited first-party titles.

It's released another of its Nintendo Direct Mini: Partner Showcase videos, running through a bunch of third-party titles coming to the Switch fairly soon, and there's plenty of news tidbits in there, including a new demo for Hyrule Warriors: Age of Calamity and a release date for Bravely Default 2. 

Grabbing our attention, though, is the news that a new version of superb paranormal shooter Control is out now on Switch, via a Cloud Version - bringing a graphically sophisticated game that we'd never have assumed the Switch could handle to the platform.

It's going to be running from the cloud, though, to explain how developer Remedy has managed the port, which is a hugely interesting bit of news, one that could open the floodgates for more modern games to appear on the Switch going forward.

Indeed, that's seemingly confirmed by the fact that Hitman 3 has also been announced for the Switch when it releases next year, and will also be coming via a cloud version. This could be the start of a big shift in how titles release for Switch, especially since so many third-party franchises will be getting more graphically demanding as they move to next-gen consoles from Sony and Microsoft. 

Of course, these cloud versions do come with heavy caveats, including the need for a consistent internet connection and the risk of that connection being insufficient to cope with the demand the streaming will place on it. Still, if it can work smoothly for people this could be a significant development for Nintendo.

The tech behind cloud versions isn't totally new, though - Capcom managed the same feat with Resident Evil 7 a couple of years ago. That was limited to Japanese Switch owners, though, so this is certainly a bigger stress test. You can download Control from the eShop now, and take advantage of a 5-minute trial that lets you see if it'll work on your internet connection, before having to pay for the full game. 

Writing by Max Freeman-Mills.