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(Pocket-lint) - The newest addition to Renault's E-TECH range is a new take on the Mégane, the Mégane E-TECH. It's Renault's largest electric car to date (outside of its vans) and puts it in direct competition with the VW ID3, the Tesla Model 3, and the Kia EV6. So, stiff competition, but there's some big tech going into this new Mégane.

First off, though, the design is worth chatting about. As it's an electric car and there's no internal combustion motor, there's loads of room to change the overall design. Renault has made it so there's a wheel in every corner, making it fairly boxy, but no doubt utilising the internal space as much as possible. It's also got a much higher ride than the normal Mégane, which is all the rage with new EVs.

Inside you'll find a 24" screen, which is massive. It controls the OpenR single-screen entertainment system, absolutely dominating the dashboard. It's split between a central display and the dials behind the steering wheel. There are all kinds of recycled materials found throughout too.

But the important bit is what drives the new Mégane E-TECH. There are two power options for the same motor, either 96kW (130hp) and 250Nm
or 160kW (218hp) and 300Nm. It only comes in at 145kg, which is said to be 10% lighter than the power unit on the ZOE. The battery options are 40kWh and 60kWh, with a claimed range of 300km and 470km. Renault claims the thinnest EV battery too, which no doubt helps the interior dimensions.

Charging speed is a healthy 130W, from high-speed chargers, so you won't be spending too much time at charging stations. There's even regenerative braking to recoup some of that spent energy while on the move.

The Renault Mégane E-TECH looks like a great entry into the larger EV segment, and with the collaboration with Nissan, it will no doubt lead the way for even more options from Renault in the near future.

Writing by Claudio Rebuzzi. Originally published on 6 September 2021.