Aston Martin initially revealed some plans for the Rapide E in 2016. Since then the electric car landscape has changed dramatically, but much of the plan remains the same: the Rapide E is designed to drive and handle like the V12-powered Rapide S. 

Rather than following the path set out by Tesla, Aston Martin is looking to stay true to its identity, with twin electric motors powering the rear wheels through a limited slip differential, offering 610PS. Aston Martin tells us that the chassis will also be tuned so car handles like its namesake.

On the technical front, Williams Advanced Engineering are working alongside Aston Martin, slotting the pure electric powertrain into the space previously occupied by the V12 engine, gearbox and fuel tanks.

Aston MartinAston Martin Rapide E image 2

Like Audi's etron, Aston is keen to stress that the battery is designed for repeat performance; although the sub-4 second 0-60 mph time doesn't sound too aggressive, the 50-70mph time is 1.5 seconds. Top speed is said to be 155mph and the range 200 miles WLTP, from a 65kWh battery. 

That's not a huge capacity battery - Tesla has a 100kWh battery, Audi has a 90kWh as does Jaguar - and that explains the range. But at the same time, this is a sports car and the battery size and weight has likely been considered with handling in mind. 

Repeat performance is very much part of the story here: Aston Martin says that on a lap of the Nürburgring there will be "absolutely no derating of the battery", meaning it should perform as a track car, where the Tesla's thermal limiting poses a problem.

Aston Martin has confirmed that it's using an 800V system. A typical 50kW charger will give you 184 miles in an 1 hour, but it will be able to use 100kW or higher for a faster charging speed.

The Aston Martin Rapide E will be built at the St. Athan facility in the UK, where Aston will also be producing Lagonda luxury EVs. The Rapide E should be delivered to customers in late-2019, but Aston Martin has only committed to building 155 units.