(Pocket-lint) - Uber has published a mighty list of changes in its safety measures in the UK, in the hope of avoiding operating bans in London and other British regions.

Many of the new practices directly address concerns cited by Transport for London and other regulators as part of their withdrawal of the firm's private hire operator licences around the country.

For example, Uber is changing its policy on reporting series incidents to the police - something directly referred to in a TfL statement on why it decided not to reissue a licence to operate at the end of last year.

"We’re changing our approach to reporting serious incidents to the police. While we previously encouraged and supported individuals to report to the police serious incidents related to a trip booked through our app, we will now pro-actively make the reports," wrote the GM of Uber UK, Tom Elvidge in a lengthy statement of intent.

"Under our new approach we will pass directly to the police information about any serious incident reported to us by riders. If a driver is a victim of a serious incident we will also report it to the police if the driver wants us to do so on their behalf."

He claims that Uber now already enforces this policy in London and works closely with the Metropolitan Police.

Other measures brought into action include 24/7 telephone support for riders and drivers, the ability for drivers to also share their trip with friends and loved ones so they can be tracked like their passengers, and, from March, riders will be sent the licensing details of their driver, including private hire licence number, with their booking confirmation and electronic receipt.

A new driver hours feature has also been implemented. Drivers must now go offline for at least six straight hours after 10 hours of trips.

Uber claims that, on average, its UK drivers only log into the app for roughly 30 hours a week, but this new rule will ensure that they do not drive when exhausted.

Writing by Rik Henderson.