Snap Inc, the social media company behind the popular photo-sharing app Snapchat is apparently considering the option to make Snaps last longer and even stick around permanently. 

A source familiar with the company's plans has been talking to Reuters about the changes. These updates are apparently part of a plan to rejuvenate interest in the app and keep users engaged. 

Snapchat has been losing money recently and has seen its user base shrink too. This decline in popularity is partly down to the rising interest in social networking rival Instagram and the addition of features like Stories to that app last year. 

Snapchat also saw user backlash after updates and design changes which didn't prove as popular as the company might have liked. Although the new changes would only apply to public photos and videos, there's still a question around whether users would approve. 

There's also the consideration of user privacy and the legal implications of the move for user's data. After all, there is a danger of revealing a user's identity on these permanent public posts. However, there will also be an option to manually delete the posts too. 

The source has told Reuters that the plan will only affect content shared to "Our Story" - a feature of the app that shares snaps to a wider audience. These snaps could then show in Discover, within Snap Map and on external sites too. These public posts already last longer than standard posts, but will soon include the option to last until they're removed. 

This change is also designed to help improve visibility and support the partnership Snapchat made with various news discovery platforms last year. It's hoped that it will encourage media sites to write more about public snaps and cover breaking news that's originally appeared within the app. 

Publishers are thought to be more likely to write about stories and embed Snapchat posts if there's no danger of the content disappearing over time. This could mean your future stories could appear on sites such as BuzzFeed, NBC News, The New York Times, The Economist and more.

It is thought users of the app may be unhappy with this move as they're already known to value their privacy. Snap Inc will no doubt need to take care not to make similar missteps to Facebook which saw various privacy scandals in 2018.