Snapchat is rolling out a massive update to users in the UK - and people are not happy about it.

The update essentially shuffles around core features, like putting Snapchat Stories from your friends on the Chat/Friend screen (to the left of the camera). Plus, there's a new algorithm that's supposed to order your friends by whom you speak to most. Meanwhile, swiping right from the Camera screen will bring you to Discover, which now has a full-screen, vertically-scrolling layout.

It's weird. If you hate change, you will hate the new Snapchat. Unfortunately, there is no easy way to downgrade the app once it's been upgraded on your device, though there is a workaround, which we'll explain in a bit. Honestly, the best way to avoid the whole mess is to turn off automatic updates. If you'd like to learn more about that, keep reading. We got you.

Option one:

Yes, you can go back to a previous version of Snapchat if your Android device has been rooted.

If so, you just have to find the installation file for the previous update and install that version. Android uses APK files for apps. You can search online for an app's name, version number, and APK, though you should have a copy of the APK files for every version of an app you’ve updated. You can grab Snapchat's APK file from the /data/app/folder. Once you do that, uninstall the newer version of the app.

Now, plug your device into a PC, then - using Windows Explorer (File Explorer) - drop the older APK file into a new folder or the Download folder. At this point, you’ll need to download or buy an Android File Explorer app to find the file on your Android device, and then you can just tap on it and install it. Yeah. We told you it wasn't easy. Sorry.

Option two:

Android users could also try to download an older version of Snapchat from here as an alternative. But first, allow downloads from unknown sources on your device. Open the device settings, then look for a gear icon in the notification shade near the top left corner, and tap on it. Scroll down to the Security section, then tap to open it, and scroll down to the entry labeled Unknown sources.

From there, read the subtext and the pop-up box warning and then click OK to enable the setting. That's it!

iPhone and iPad users have it a little better. They can download to an older version of Snapchat via iTunes. You’ll just be using the old copy of the app that’s still saved in your iTunes library. But first, delete the new version on your device (by pressing the app’s icon for several seconds and then tapping the X in the corner). Then, connect your device to your computer and open iTunes.

You'll need to select your device, but do not sync yet. Click the Applications tab, then select Apps in the iTunes sidebar, and find Snapchat (or the app you want reinstall in iTunes’ Apps list). Select the option to Install and then sync your device. The version you have stored in iTunes will copy over to your device. As long as it’s an older version, you'll be able to get rid of the new Snapchat.

OK, so, thanks to Twitter, some users have claimed that this workaround works (see tweet below), but Pocket-lint has yet to replicate it. Try it yourself and let us know in the comments. Good luck.

If you haven't received the new update and want to avoid the million steps it takes to downgrade Snapchat once the update does arrive on your device, do yourself a favour and turn off automatic updates now (or, you could suck it up and embrace the new design).

  1. Open the Play Store app
  2. From the main menu, tap Settings.
  3. Now, disable Auto-update apps.

You can also turn off auto-update just for Snapchat, specifically.

  1. Go to Snapchat's app page on the Play Store
  2. Tap the menu button (three vertical dots).
  3. From there, you'll be able to turn off auto-update for Snapchat.

Unlike Android users, you can't disable auto-update for individual apps. But you can for all apps.

  1. Open the Settings app.
  2. Swipe up until you find iTunes & App Store.
  3. Under Automatic Downloads, turn off the toggle next to Updates.

Snapchat's CEO and co-founder explained the new Snapchat update in the video above. Also, check out some of Pocket-lint's own guides: