Sony is at CES 2016 in Las Vegas, where it has decided to launch new high-resolution audio products, including what it has described as the "world's smallest" hi-res audio wireless speaker.

This speaker, called H.ear go, is part of a new H.ear range being offered by Sony. The H.ear go features a 35mm-diameter, full-range speaker unit, with the left and right channel speaker chambers housing dual-passive radiators, allowing the Bluetooth-enabled device to pump out incredible-sounding bass It also features a 12-hour battery life, USB-B and Audio-In ports, and built-in support for Google Cast and Spotify Connect.

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Sony has also launched colourful headband-style wireless headphones as well as behind-the-neck-style wireless headphones. The former is called H.ear on, while the latter is called H.ear in. Both headsets are wireless, but the over-the-ear set comes with a 40 mm HD driver unit, digital noise-cancelling technology, and a 20-hour battery life. The other headphones just have a 9mm driver unit but also offers a microphone with HD voice.

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Everything in the H.ear range will be available from May in five different colours (Viridian Blue, Cinnabar Red, Charcoal Black, Lime Yellow or Bordeaux Pink). There's no word yet on pricing, but Sony did unveil one other hi-res audio product during its event. This isn't a H.ear-branded device. It's actually a turntable called the PS-HX500. It not only plays records but also converts them to hi-res audio files.

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Just use the PS-HX500 PC application software to convert any vinyl into hi-res audio files on your PC. Sony says this is the world’s first turntable to support double-rate and single-rate DSD (5.6MHz/1bit, 2.8MHz/1bit) and an AD conversion process that include a choice of file quality from WAV, to high-resolution audio with higher bit rate and sampling frequencies, through to double-rate DSD.

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The PS-HX500 will be available from April. Again, no word yet on pricing. And the unit we saw, unfortunately, was a dummy, so we couldn't hear it in action.