The Nintendo Switch has been revealed in full. We know the price, release date and the accessories to expect at launch and throughout the year. You can even pre-order the new console yourself.

But what about the games? There's a healthy list of titles we now know about, but are any of them good? And which ones will you want to buy first?

We played several of them at a dedicated Nintendo Switch event in London to find out. And if these are anything to go by, the future of the Switch is looking rosy.

We loved the original Wii U Splatoon in 2015 and are over the moon about its return for Switch.

The demo we played at the Nintendo Switch event though was a little limited, so we couldn't quite see exactly how different and improved it'll be over the original. Bar a new weapon, the Splat Duelies - two pistol-like blasters - the game played similar to before. It was a couple of levels of four versus four multiplayer where we had to cover as much ground in our own ink as possible.

We did, however, play using the Switch in handheld mode, which was similar to the experience of playing it on a Wii U GamePad. It uses motion controls to move the visual plane. Others used the new Pro Controllers though, so it can also be played conventionally too.

The graphics are a touch sharper, and while we didn't see much, we saw enough to know that it'll be every bit as popular as the original.

Mario Kart 8 was arguably the best game on the Nintendo Wii U so it comes as no surprise that there will be a Switch version within the console's launch window.

It was available to play in several ways at the console's hands-on event we attended. You could use a Joy-Con inside a tiny steering wheel accessory, play a two-player version with a Pro Controller or take part in an eight-player race using the Switch in handheld mode.

We chose the latter and were glad we did. It was a fairly standard-style race, surprisingly without motion controls - using the clipped on Joy-Con thumbsticks and buttons instead. But when presented in 720p and at 60 frames per second, it looked superb on the portable screen.

Major changes for this version include the ability to collect and store two weapons at once, and the character roster has been expanded to add several new faces. The Inkling Boy and Inkling Girl from Splatoon are just two.

Although it has more than enough tweaks to bring the series bang up to date, Super Bomberman R feels every bit the game we fell in love with on the SNES back in the 90s.

Multiplayer is huge fun, with four players running around top-down maps trying to take each other out with well-placed explosives. There is verticality now, with different floor heights on levels, but for intents and purposes the silliness and belly-laughs remain.

A campaign mode will be added on the release version too, with boss battles punctuating scrollable levels to progress through. And in many ways, even though it's a Konami rather than first-party Nintendo game, this could well be one of the launch titles most sought after.

The latest Zelda is the one game for the Nintendo Switch we've known about for ages. That's because it was announced last year that the Switch edition would be released alongside the much-delayed Wii U version. And there is no doubt about it, this is the jewel in the Nintendo launch line-up.

It is identical to the Wii U version in gameplay, but the graphics are sharper and draw distances in the huge open world setting are further. Indeed, we could tell this specifically because the Switch event demo was identical to the one we played on the Wii U at E3 last June.

This time though, we used the Pro Controller to manoeuvre Link around the landscape and fight several denizens of a decaying Hyrule.

To be honest, Nintendo could have stuck a Link hat on a stick figure and had us play Pong and we'd still be queuing to buy it. It's Zelda, innit?

Originally released as a Wii U launch title, back in 2013, Lego City Undercover is a largely forgotten gem.

That's why Warner Bros has brought it out of hiding, given it a new, shiny coat of paint and is about to set it free again. It'll be available on Nintendo Switch, as well as PC, PS4 and Xbox One, and if you like the humour that underpins all of the Lego platform games, you'll love this one.

It benefits greatly from featuring an original story - one that's not tied into a movie licence - and in many ways the open-world nature of the game, coupled with vehicles to drive, makes it almost a Lego answer to the Grand Theft Auto series.

We're thrilled it's getting a new lease of life and think you will be too.

There's no point in holding your breath for the major Mario release on Nintendo Switch as it is far from a launch window title. Instead, it will be the major driver for the console come Christmas as it is currently listed as being released in the "holiday season".

It does look good though. It looks very good indeed.

The 3D platformer takes in all-manner of surroundings, including the "real world", in what is being called a sandbox-style Mario game in the same mould as Super Mario 64 and Super Mario Sunshine. And that's good company to be in.

We don't really know an awful lot about the game right now, with only the same trailer running at the Nintendo Switch hands-on event rather than playable code, but we expect to find out more at E3 this summer.

We cannot wait.