Thanks to the Xbox One's now inextricable link with Windows 10 the platform is very attractive to independent developers. They can essentially develop for PC and easily translate their games for Xbox One too, or vice versa.

What's more, the ID@Xbox scheme gives indie studios two free Xbox One dev kits apiece, ensuring that they have all the tools needed to develop for the console. That's why the Xbox Live store is rapidly being filled with excellent downloadable games for the Xbox One on a weekly basis.

Pocket-lint was invited to try some of those that are coming to the platform soon, which we had extensive hands-on plays with. So here are our tips of the indies and small publisher titles you would be well advised to check out in the near future.

Compulsion GamesWeHappyFew_02

We Happy Few was a big hit during E3 2016, with the first gameplay trailer proving very popular and effective. It set the tone for the first-person game by showing its dark side, with a pinata smashing event illustrating the horrific and stark reality that is usually disguised through taking "Joy" pills. Seeing in-game work colleagues hunched over a decaying rat, eating entrails that they think are sweets will live with us forever.

At the ID@Xbox event we got to play the game beyond that initial sequence. Set in an alternative 1960s England, We Happy Few is inspired by mind-bending early thrillers and surreal movies, such as A Clockwork Orange or The Prisoner.

The populace are kept blissfully unaware of their awful surroundings through regular dosing of drugs, but after you decide to abandon your prescription, you soon see what lies outside of the hallucinogenic haze.

We had to escape a decrepit small country village, after playing through the same sequence shown at E3, and while we didn't manage to succeed in the time we had, we did get to see some of the other gameplay mechanics at work. There is a hefty focus on crafting, for example, with resources abounding throughout the game, but only really useful when combined with others.

We also got hit on the noggin a fair few times by the clown-faced police.

The game itself will be available very soon, so we're not far from bringing you a full review. Until then though, we have to say that this could be a massive hit. 

Ghost Town GamesOvercooked

Remember when good multiplayer games had you and several chums hunkered around the same screen and console? Micro Machines, Super Bomberman, Super Mario Kart, Super Smash Brothers, Gauntlet and many other 90s classics used to descend us into fits of giggles thanks to having all the combatants in the same room at the same time.

Overcooked is not a competitive game but it comes from the same stock. It is a local multiplayer co-op title and, from what we've played so far, echoes all of the fun and joy we experienced from the Super Nintendo and Mega Drive masterpieces of old.

It puts up to four players in control of cooks in a kitchen. Customers make demands for food and you have to prepare their dishes. It sounds easy and, on early levels, it is. However, there are several tasks to complete, so we found that different players naturally gravitated towards different aspects of food preparation.

For example, during our gameplay session, we had to prepare soup. First the onions or tomatoes needed to be fetched from their individual boxes, then sliced. They then needed to be added to the pot, which would then cook on the stove. Before it burned, it needed to be poured into a bowl and served. The bowl was then returned, needing to be washed up so the process could continue.

Players can adopt any of those tasks, but there are caveats. Some levels have thin corridors, so you can only have one player wandering that space at a time. Some are far more outlandish, such as a travelling truck that splits and rejoins often, so you have to wait to travel from one side to another.

All of the factors prompt co-operation - and hilarity. Much much hilarity. It is a true co-op game in every respect and we cannot wait to play more with our friends and colleagues at home.

Team 172016-02-11_00100

Who doesn't love Worms? As we explained for Overcooked above, we're big fans of games with local multiplayer play and there are few that offer as satisfying an experience as those in the Worms stable.

Worms W.M.D. continues a fine tradition of adding new features and tweaks to the franchise, making the game bigger, with options for mayhem, yet it retains the same basic formula that has had us in fits for more than 20 years.

Vehicles is one addition, with tanks and helicopters dotted around levels that can be manned by your Worms. There are also new, static weapon placements, such as a sniper rifle position or mortar. that you can take over. And crafting finally comes to the franchise, with many if not all of the armoury able to be moulded into something even more lethal and/or hilarious.

We played a spot of single-player and then had a multiplayer match with all of the games weaponry switched on by default. It gave us an idea of just how many different weapons of mass destruction are on offer. With crafting, you can amass a load-out of up to 81 different weapons, including barbecued sheep - the usual exploding sheep but leaving flames wherever they touch.

Hand-painted backgrounds, rather than the rendered scenery of recent outings, return to the series, but new for this game are buildings you can actually enter, taking fights inside as well as out.

It all makes for a much improved game, we think, than any to have come for a while. We'll find out for sure towards the end of August.

Bulkhead Interactivess8

Bulkhead Interactive had great success with Pheuma: Breath of Life, a first-person puzzle game that also had the honour of being the first Xbox One game to be made in Unreal Engine 4. It is also developing the Kickstarter funded Battalion 1944, a World War II multiplayer shooter to be released in spring next year.

Its next game though is similar in concept to the first, with The Turing Test being a first-person puzzler, albeit with a science fiction setting this time out.

Progression is based on solving sometimes very complex logic puzzles, and as we didn't have a scooby what to do when we picked up the controller for the first time, nor were treated to a tutorial, it is testament to the game that we very soon got the hang of it.

Players take control of Ava Turing, an engineer exploring a station on Europa, one of the moons of Europa, to look for life signs. The story plays out while you unlock new areas through cunning puzzle completion which, in our case, involved partly picking up junction boxes and placing them in door panels, or sucking the energy out of one location with a gun-like tool, and firing it into another.

There's a little of Portal in the control method, but we suspect that later in the game the similarities aren't as distinct. We also didn't get much of a chance to engage with the plot at this stage, so are looking forward to a proper, uninterrupted play to unravel the game's mysteries.

Studio MDHRcuphead-flower1

There has been a lot of hype around Cuphead since we first saw it at E3 2015 and we have to say, based on our session with a more complete build, it is mostly justified.

Cuphead is a hark back to the glory days of 2D platform action games, while adopting a quite simply incredible graphical look. Inspired by the Disney and Max Fleischer cartoons of the 1930s, the look is amazing. The characters look cell animated and even the colours are slightly offset to give the whole image a retro, reproduced feel.

But where Cuphead will be heralded most is in its gameplay. It is unapologetically fierce. We have had a swathe of difficult 2D platformers in recent times, with Ori and the Blind Forest and Super Meatboy being most memorable, but we have to say, based on our initial playtime, that Cuphead could be the toughest of the lot. And we love it.

We played a few boss battles, a flying section and a platform level and we died. A lot. But most importantly, we wanted to persevere, as it hooks you into that "one more go" cycle and there's not much higher praise than that.

We can't wait to play the full game when it arrives, finally, next month.