Some Apple device owners were made really happy Thursday, while others probably balled up their fists and cursed the Cupertino company.

Apple opened two beta programs to the public: iOS 10 (a major update to its mobile operating system, which is formally due to this autumn alongside the next iPhones) and MacOS Sierra (a major update to its desktop operating system, which is also formally due later this year). These programs allow anyone with an iPhone, iPad, or Mac to test the latest software and features for their devices.

Well, almost anyone.

As with every major update in the past, the final, stable versions of iOS 10 and MacOS Sierra - as well as the public betas that just opened- will only work on compatible devices, and many old devices didn't make the cut this time around. So, before you get excited about either beta, it's worth checking to see if you were jilted by the company for owning an outdated device.

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iPad 2, iPad 3rd gen, iPad Mini, iPhone 4s, iPod Touch 5th gen

In other words, million of iPads - specifically, iPad 2 tablets - are now obsolete. According to data compiled in March by mobile engagement firm Localytics, roughly 40 per cent of all iPads currently in use cannot run iOS 10, meaning they'll no longer receive security updates and patches. The iPad 2, which was sold between March 2011 and March 2014, makes up an 18-per cent share.

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While not yet posted to the MacOS preview webpage, a slide shown off by Craig Federighi, SVP of Software Engineering, during the WWDC 2016 keynote in June revealed the software's hardware requirements. It isn't compatible with:

MacBook from early 2009 or older, MacBook Air from late 2009 or older, MacBook Pro from late 2010 or older, iMac from early 2009 or older, Mac Mini from late 2009 or older, or Mac Pro from late 2009 or older

If you own anything newer than the devices listed above, congratulations. Go download the public betas for iOS 10 and MacOS Sierra.