Samsung has used its Samsung Unpacked press conference on the eve of Mobile World Congress 2016 to launch the two smartphones many were expecting and a virtual reality camera that might have taken some by surprise.

The Samsung Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 edge phones have been subject to much speculation over the last few weeks and the actual devices are indeed those that appeared in several picture leaks.

The Galaxy S7 has a 5.1-inch Super AMOLED Quad HD screen, 12-megapixel dual pixel camera that works much better in low light conditions than its predecessor and has faster autofocus, and its processing is 30 per cent faster than the SGS6, with a 64 per cent faster GPU too.

READ: Samsung Galaxy S7 preview: Premium for the traditionalists

It is water and dustproof to IP68 standards, which means it can be submerged in water up to 1.5 meters in depth and for 30 minutes. There's also an always-on display that uses very little of the 3,000mAh battery power yet can display the time, date or notifications should you not want to turn the phone on completely.

READ: Samsung Galaxy S7 edge review: The best smartphone Samsung has ever made?

The Samsung Galaxy S7 edge shares many of the same features and specifications, but has a larger, 5.5-inch screen and 3,600mAh battery. It also has a greater array of sidebar functions this time around, with the ability to have news feeds or dedicated third-party apps appear on the edge of the screen.

The Samsung Gear 360 is the oddest looking of the three new devices, however. It wouldn't seem out of place in one of the upcoming Star Wars films.

Pocket-lintSamsung Gear 360-6

It is a spherical camera that is designed to take 360-degree images or video, which are perfect to watch inside a virtual reality headset, such as Samsung's own Gear VR.

READ: Samsung Gear 360 camera preview: Gear VR-friendly virtual reality video recorder

There are 195-degree lens front and back, which are both capable of shooting 180-degree images (with overlap to stitch them together).

A dedicated smartphone app can be used to view the recordings or stills, stitch them together and even post the end results to a number of different sites, including YouTube and Facebook - both of which supporting 360-degree content.

Prices and release dates for all of the devices are yet to be revealed.