Google's same-day delivery service is adding fresh groceries to its basket.

According to Bloomberg, Google Express will soon deliver fresh foods in two US cities by the end of this year. If you're interested in learning more about this new offering from Google Express, including where it'll be available, how it works, and when you can try it, we've laid out all the necessary details below.

Here's everything we know so far...

Google Express was originally called Google Shopping Express.

It is a service that lets you shop local stores online in order to get merchandise and dry foods delivered to your door on the same day or overnight. It launched in 2013 on a free trial basis in San Francisco and Silicon Valley, though it later expanded to New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Boston, and Washington DC.

But Google just confirmed Google Express will expand to 25 million more people in the Midwest. The service will soon serve six states in that region (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin).

Go to the Google Express site in order to shop for what you need all in one place. From there, add items to your cart, then select a delivery window, and check out using Google Payments. Google Express will process your order in the store and arrange for a driver to bring it to your address during the designated delivery window.

If you're an Express member, all deliveries are free for eligible orders totaling $15 or more per store. But if you don't have $15 worth of goods, you’ll see a $3 fee from each store. To join from a desktop, visit your My Account page on Google Express, then click Membership, and click Sign up for Membership.

Follow the steps from there. But if you're on a mobile device, tap the Menu button at the upper left of your screen (or swipe right to open the drawer), then select Account, and select Membership. Then follow the steps.

Keep in mind new customers can try Google Express for free for three months. Once your free trial membership expires, you'll be automatically enrolled in the payment plan you selected during signed up, unless you choose to end your membership. A membership costs $10 a month or $95 a year.

If you're not a Google Express member, you'll see a delivery fee starting at $4.99 per store (again, for eligible orders totaling $15 or more per store - but you'll see a $3 fee from each store if you don't have $15 in goods).

Note: There's also a Google Express app for iOS and Android.

Here's a list of some stores that currently accept orders via Google Express:

  • Ace Hardware, Barnes and Noble, Costco, Fry’s Electronics, Kohl’s, L’Occitane en Provence, Moosejaw, PetSmart, Road Runner Sports, Staples, Target, Toys R Us, Babies R Us, Treasure Island Foods, Ulta Beauty, The Vitamin Shoppe, Walgreens, and Wrigleyville Sports

Google told Bloomberg that it will start delivering fresh food and groceries to your door as well. The new offering is part of Google Express and will include same-day delivery, but it's only in the testing stages at this point and is expected to have a limited launch in just two US cities later this year.

The trial will begin in San Francisco and another city that hasn't been announced. Google Express already delivers merchandise and dry foods, but now it'll deliver fresh foods and groceries, including fruits and vegetables.

Whole Foods Market and Costco will be among Google’s partners for the new offering. By partnering with these stores so you can seemingly order directly from them, Google won't have to rely on warehouses, which it's been trying moving away from due to cost issues involving refrigeration and more, according to Bloomberg.

Google basically wants to better compete with Amazon, which has been rolling out its grocery-delivery service, called AmazonFresh, in several US cities as of late. Amazon is even entering the restaurant-delivery business soon.

Bloomberg claimed online groceries are a $10.9 billion industry in the US, and that's expected to grow 9.6 per cent annually through 2019. Google clearly wants a piece of the pie (and Amazon's slice while it's at it).