Tech shows always deliver a host of the weird and wonderful. This year the Consumer Electronics Show has ventured over to China for the first time, with the inaugural CES Asia showing off a variety of products and concepts from international and Asian brands.

We've seen self-driving cars, hypnotising sleeping caps, robotic dresses, and cutesy app-controlled home monitors. Oh, and dozens of drones and fitness trackers. Here's our whistlestop tour of the diverse gadgets that have caught our techie attention at CES Asia 2015...

A robotic spider dress

Yes fashion fans, the lead image above is a 3D-printed dress complete with biosignal-controlled robotic arms, reminiscent of an arachnid. Created by designer Anouk Wipprecht, the Spider Dress 2.0 utilises an Intel Edison chipset to read biosignals from its wearer which, in turn, cause those shoulder-mounted robotic arms to react: approach too fast and they'll extend in a warning fashion, approach in a more leisurely fashion and they'll poise in a more welcoming position. There are also eye-like orbs which illuminate when approached. It's kind of creepy, yet kind of cool to actually see it in the flesh.

The self-driving supercar

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The Audi R8 e-tron 2016 drove itself onto the stage at Audi's pre-show keynote. Yep, it's a driverless supercar (or what Audi likes to call the "piloted driving" model) and the third to join the German auto maker's line-up of autonomous cars. Only this one goes a bit heavier on the eye candy; it looks like the kind of car Iron Man would drive and, given its predicted $250,000 price tag, it's in a similar price bracket that only the Tony Starks of this world will be able to afford.

A brainwave-controlling sleeping cap

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This is no swimming cap. It's the Sleep Shepherd, a sleep aid that creates resonant audio signals to stimulate brainwaves said to ease you into sleep. Having donned one on the show floor it's an unusual experience: the audio signals are akin to having tinnitus. The left and right ear signals are said to harmonise to create a rhythmic sensation like an inaudible "note" in the brain. Beats popping pills or counting sheep - if you can get over wearing the headband and volume box in the first place, we suppose. 

The ultimate action cam

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ImagineVision is hardly a household name, but its interchangeable lens 4K camera is an interesting take on the action cam. Utilising the Micro Four Thirds lens mount - as adopted by Panasonic and Olympus - the Z Camera, as its known, can capture 4K video at 30fps or 16-megapixel stills. All with the option of changing the lens to an optic of your choice. It's surprisingly easy to use, with a single shutter/record button on top and a variety of buttons to cycle through controls on the rear screen.

A home monitor called Pudding

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There's a lot in a name. And when you have the option of buying generic home monitors or a quirky robot one called Pudding then, well, there's no competition really. This app-controlled little fella, made by Roobo, can rotate to obtain a better angle of view delivered back to your phone, capture footage internally or store to the cloud, has speakers should you want to deliver a message and, perhaps most importantly, even has a digital face that can be given expressions via the app. Cute.