Valve has filed for a trademark for something it is calling Chaperone, which relates to its virtual reality technologies and has provoked a ripple of excitement from the gaming community.

The logo itself is fairly indistinct, but the description of what it relates to is far more interesting. According to the filing, sent two months ago to the US Patent and Trademark Office, the Chaperone name relates to "hardware and software, sensors, and beacons for the detection and measurement of physical objects and the representation of such objects in virtual reality environments."

It continues: "Devices used for the detection and measurement of physical objects and the representation of such objects in virtual reality environments; electronic apparatus for the detection and measurement of physical objects and the representation of such objects in virtual reality environments."

Some believe that it could be development tools for VR software makers to implement real world objects into virtual environments, but we think it could already have been shown at Mobile World Congress earlier this year.

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When we played with the new Vive headset Valve has devised with HTC, not only did we notice two laser systems in the room for spatial awareness, but one of the demos clearly showed the representation of physical walls in the room within our virtual world, so we didn't bump into them.

ValveChaperone logo

Perhaps Chaperone is the name Valve wants to give to that technology? After all, the lasers are "sensors" detecting "physical objects".

It stands to reason that the system we feel marks Vive apart from rivals, the ability to move around in the real world environment without falling over objects, has a name.

Mystery solved? What do you think.