Zane Lowe, the BBC Radio 1 DJ has announced that he will leave the BBC in March to join Apple.

Lowe, who has been with the BBC for 12 years, currently hosts a number of shows at the station, but is giving all that up to relocate to Cupertino with his family.

Apple hasn't said what the DJ will be doing at the company although that hasn't stopped many commentators speculating what Lowe's new job at Apple could be.

READ: Apple Beats Music-like streaming service: Is it actually happening, and when?

The smart money is that Lowe will join the company's iTunes Radio division helping to curate music for its subscribers.

iTunes Radio has struggled to make an impact in the US against other services like Spotify, so Lowe could be part of a fresh attack to make it more relevant, but there could also be a host of other jobs to fill.

So what job could be on Lowe's business card in the future?

Apple's iTunes Radio, currently only available in the US and Australia, allows users to stream music to their phone as if they were tuning into a radio station.

While it has had some popularity, the move to hire numerous DJs around the world to help you discover music - very much in the same way a standard radio station does - could allow iTunes to offer something very different to the likes of Deezer or Spotify.

His new job could be as simple as him doing what he's done for the BBC, but only for those that own an Apple device.

The London-based iTunes Festival is a huge hit with music fans and Apple's way of celebrating and associating itself with the music it sells every year.

Lowe, who has been heralded with finding bands and acts like Ed Sheeran in the past, could use his global music contacts to take the iTunes Festival hit other cities and ensure that the best acts are playing on a world wide stage. 

Lowe's ability to find acts and discover new music is a brilliant asset and one that Apple will enjoy as his new employer. Add that to his ability to present an incredibly popular radio show means he has an eye for what people want. Expand that out to Apple's iTunes services and the company's newly acquired Beats offering and guiding Apple to success will be easy.

Apple don't have a record label, it has always been about the hardware and letting others create the content, but we've already seen the success video streaming services like Netflix and Amazon are having with creating their own content like House of Cards and Ripper Street.

It is a long stretch, but just in the same way Lowe could have been hired to advise, could he have been hired to become Apple's first Artists & Repertoire head for an iTunes record label?

What better man for the job than someone who has relationships with most big artists and has made a career out of finding new talent?

Weak we know, but Lowe could have been hired to create a weekly music podcast interviewing all the big stars in music around the world.

Now that Dr Dre is on the Apple board he's going to be working very hard. All that thirsty work is going to mean tea, tea and more tea. New Zealand born Lowe has lived in England so long he's probably a dab hand at making tea, and Dre knows it.