In case you haven't heard: Taylor Swift doesn't like Spotify.

She's just the latest artist to not only speak out against music-streaming services but also withhold an album release and remove an entire back catalogue of music from Spotify.

There have been several musicians and bands in recent years - heck, since Spotify founded in 2008 - who have also dug their heels into the ground and asserted that they wan't more money and better deals for their work.

At the same time, tonnes of artists have wholly accepted Spotify and even launched their albums or pre-releases exclusively through the streaming service. There's clearly a debate roaring, in which our favourite melody-makers either love or hate Spotify.

And here's a look at a few examples, from both sides.

READ: Spotify Free vs Spotify Premium

Taylor Swift

Taylor Swift's latest album, 1989, is expected to have the largest sales week for any album since 2002, but that milestone is being overshadowed by Swift’s decision to not release the album on Spotify. She also removed her entire back catalogue from the service.

In an interview with Yahoo Music, Swift said: "Music is changing so quickly, and the landscape of the music industry itself is changing so quickly, that everything new, like Spotify, all feels to me a bit like a grand experiment. And I'm not willing to contribute my life's work to an experiment that I don't feel fairly compensates the writers, producers, artists, and creators of this music".

Coldplay

Yes, Coldplay is on Spotify. But the band hasn't eagerly embraced the streaming service. In fact, you couldn't stream Coldplay's new album Ghost Stories on Spotify for at least a couple of months after it had been released.

Coldplay had withheld the full album for a bit, though that wasn't a big surprise to some. It premiered the album as a pre-release stream on Apple's iTunes, after all, and withheld the album Mylo Xyloto from streaming services for four months after it went on sale.

Thom Yorke

While Yorke is known for being the lead singer and songwriter of the bands Radiohead and Atoms for Peace, he's also known for his beef with Spotify. He notably pulled his solo work from the streaming service, and last October, while speaking to Mexican website Sopitas, he likened Spotify to "the last desperate fart of a dying corpse".

The Black Keys

The Black Keys’ last two albums aren't on Spotify, and the band has been very vocal about why it doesn't like the streaming service. Drummer Patrick Carney, for instance, during a 2012 Rolling Stone interview, called Spotify board member (and Napster founder) Sean Parker an "asshole".

More recently, Carney told The Seattle Times: “My whole thing about music is: if somebody’s making money then the artist should be getting a fair cut of it. The owner of Spotify is worth something like 3 billion dollars…he’s richer than Paul McCartney and he’s 30 and he’s never written a song.”

The Beatles

While you can find select songs and albums from some members of The Beatles on Spotify, you can't find the actual band's entire discography on the music-streaming service. But that's not necessarily due to The Beatles hating Spotify. The band just has an exclusivity agreement with Apple's iTunes.

Other artists vocal against Spotify: Yannis Philippakis of Foals, Grizzly Bear, Aimee Mann, Nigel Godrich of Atoms for Peace, Jason Isbell, Beck, David Byrne of Talking Heads, and Sean Kinney of Alice in Chains.

Well, just look through Spotify's library.

The streaming service has over 20 million tracks licensed globally, and it claims to add over 20,000 songs a day. But here's a list of some artists who agreed to initially launch their albums or pre-releases exclusively on Spotify:

  • Led Zeppelin (entire catalogue)
  • The Misfits (entire catalogue)
  • Goldfrapp (Tales of Us album)
  • Tift Merritt (pre-release of Traveling Alone single)
  • The Killers (video trailer for Battle Born album)
  • Cazzette (Eject album)
  • Danny Elfman (Edward Scissorhands album)

Wired also published a neat round-up of all the artists and albums exclusive to Spotify. Although the list hasn't been updated in three years, it's proof that some artists have accepted Spotify and are willing to change with the times.