Chromebook owners will soon have access to a set of software services previously limited to Mac and Windows PC owners: Adobe Creative Cloud.

Because Creative Cloud is like a virtualised environment, many Chromebook owners have expected they would one day be able to use Adobe's software on their machines. And now both Google and Adobe have confirmed Creative Cloud is coming to Chrome OS. A streaming version of Photoshop will launch first for US-based Adobe education customers with a paid Creative Cloud membership.

Creative Cloud is a collection of software for graphic design, video editing, web development, photography, and cloud services. Although it has a monthly or annual subscription fee, Creative Cloud is typically downloaded from the Internet, installed directly on a local computer, and receives online updates. Last year, Adobe announced it would not release new versions of Creative Suite and would instead focus on Creative Cloud.

"This streaming version of Photoshop is designed to run straight from the cloud to your Chromebook. It's always up-to-date and fully integrated with Google Drive, so there's no need to download and re-upload files—just save your art directly from Photoshop to the cloud. For IT administrators, it's easy to manage, with no long client installation and one-click deployment to your team's Chromebooks," explained Google.

Adobe is describing the Photoshop aspect of its new initiative with Google as a technology beta. Called Project Photoshop Streaming, the beta will enable select participants to access Photoshop on Chromebooks. Adobe's streaming apps will also work directly with files in Google Drive, so you'll be able to access the program and edit directly in the cloud.

If you're interested in the beta and would like to know more now, continue reading.

1. Project Photoshop Streaming is an exclusive program, according to Abobe. Those who are interested in applying must review the eligibility requirements and application process before submitting their application to join.

2. If you are eligible to join, sign into Adobe Education Exchange and begin submitting your application. You will of course need to have or create an Adobe Education Exchange account before logging into the hub.

3. Before applying to join the beta, note the following application components: Personal and school information, Photoshop usage information, School technology infrastructure information including network infrastructure, and Google Chromebook or Chrome browser availability and usage.

4. Adobe said it will accept applicants based on their Chromebook usage and implementation plan, among other things. You can expect your application to either be approved or denied within 3 to 4 weeks after submitting.

5. If you've been approved to join the beta, a welcome email will arrive in your inbox with resources and tips for getting started.

6. For more information, including about how to apply for and access the beta, visit Adobe's Education Exchange page or FAQ page.

According to Adobe, Project Photoshop Streaming will be a web app, and you will be able to access Project Photoshop Streaming on any Chromebook or Chrome Browser (including Chrome for Windows). The experience is not supported on mobile devices however.

Creative Cloud products are typically downloaded and installed on a local system, but Project Photoshop Streaming is Adobe's way of figuring out how to provide access to Creative Cloud without having to download and install.

It's worth noting you will need to launch a new session if network connectivity is lost. A recovery folder called Photoshop Recovery will be located in your Google drive, where you'll have to double click to open and recover files.