Destiny is now available on PS4, Xbox One, Xbox 360 and PS3 and it has the potential to be the biggest game on the next-generation consoles yet. Activision launched it at a massive party in London on Monday and it could be argued that the game rumoured to have cost the company half-a-billion dollars to put together is now bigger than Call of Duty in its triple-A line-up.

Certainly, it's one of the biggest launches we've had in years and very much signifies a new wave of gaming, one that is persistently online and multiplayer, even when you aren't playing specifically with friends or foes. It is also a role-playing game as well as a first person shooter, so promises more in-depth gameplay than many others in its genre.

Pocket-lint has now been playing the final build version of the game, ever since the UK servers were switched on, and we can answer a few questions you might have. You might be considering buying the digital download version and want to know how long it will take to arrive. Or you might be wondering why you haven't read any reviews of the final game online. Hopefully, the following will give you some insights.

When the game starts it is hard to see a difference to the Destiny Beta, which many played and enjoyed for a couple of weeks recently. The same opening sequence plays and the same "get off the planet" mission takes place.

It will probably feel overly familiar but, to be honest, with the Beta experience you should race straight through the bits you've played before. Also, as we've done, you might fancy taking on a different kind of character this time out. We were a Titan in the Beta and have decided to play as a Warlock for the final game. Because of the different stype of melee attack and skill tree, that varies things.

Sadly, we had to start the game all over again. There was no option to transfer our existing Destiny Beta character into the main game. Some items will be instantly available to you - especially if you earned them during the special Beta events - but for all intents and purposes they act much like pre-order bonuses and earn you qudos more than, perhaps, practical power-ups.

The download for Destiny is large but not unmanageable. There are other games on the market that take up much more initial space on the hard drive.

In total, the download is more than 16GB (almost 18GB on the PS4) so you could have to wait hours for the game to be available to play. We have 100MB broadband and it still took the best part of an hour.

This might just be us, but we're convinced that Bungie has put further audio effects on top of Peter Dinklage's voice to make your Ghost sound even more robot-like. In the Alpha version, he sounded like a monotone human. In the Beta, there was more interference and electronic filters to give it a mechanical sound. Now there are Star Wars-style whoops and bleeps.

Basically, think Tyrion crossed with R2-D2 and you can't go far wrong.

This is the woozy as we fully expect that there will be some outlets rushing a review onto their sites just to attract visitors. However, we have to say that they couldn't possibly reflect an accurate representation of what the full Destiny experience offers.

We, like our journalistic contemporaries, only just received our copy of Destiny the day before launch - not because it is something the publisher would rather shift loads of copies of before the reviews hit the web (unlike many far from triple-A titles we could mention), but because until today the servers were not ready to play it on. A persistently online game needs an online ecosystem to function.

That means that because the servers only went online around midday on the eve of launch, we, like many peers we've talked to, would rather play the game for a sufficient amount of time before passing judgement on it.

From what we've played so far - including the Beta - we love it. But to say so now would be doing you, Activision and Bungie a great disservice. We will publish our review when we are ready, not before.

Sadly, we don't think that'll be the case with everyone.