LG announced the LG G3 Stylus in the run up to IFA 2014, bringing a Samsung Note-style device to LG's portfolio with a 5.5-inch display and rubber stylus pen.

We got the chance to get our hands on the device at the show to see what we made of it and find out how it compares to its competitors.

The LG G3 Stylus, as you would expect from its name, looks very similar to the LG G3 in terms of design but it adds a pop out rubber stylus pen to the mix.

It looks a little thicker than the flagship smartphone and we weren't overly impressed with the feel of the device as it felt a little more plasticky too but it wasn't too heavy to hold and the rounded, smooth back was comfortable in the hand.

The rear of the device features the signature power and volume rocker controls, which we like as it offers something a little different and they are convenient to use, plus the metal surround on the camera lens and the power button itself provide a touch of premium to this handset.

In terms of footprint, the LG G3 Stylus is a little smaller than the Samsung Galaxy Note 3 and features a slightly rounder design, which we liked and the very slim bezel is also present on the LG G3 Stylus which pleased us as it's a lovely look.

The display is a little disappointing on the LG G3 Stylus though as with just a 960 x 540 resolution for the 5.5-inch display, it offers just a 200ppi, which is significantly lower than the LG G3 (564ppi) and even the LG G3 s (293ppi). It would have been nice to have seen a Full HD display on this handset at least, given its size, but we suspect the idea is to keep it cheap and cheerful rather than put it into flagship territory.

It wasn't a complete disaster but the icons at the top of the display were visibly fuzzier than on the LG G3 and the LG G3 s, as you would expect. If you aren't too picky about these things and you want a large device with the stylus functionality then it will probably serve you well but against the Samsung display, the difference was noticeable.

The rubber stylus pen is nice though and offers a more premium look to Samsung's Note 3 that comes with a plastic body and a metal tip, while the LG G3 Stylus pen has a metal body and plastic tip.

The handset reacts well when you use it to draw and there are a number of pre-loaded apps that will make use of it but we didn't have a chance to play with it properly during our short time with it.

One thing we did notice was that no app or menu launched automatically when the stylus is pulled out like it does with the Samsung Note 3, which we would have liked to have seen to make proper use of the pen. This could be down to the fact that the LG G3 Stylus on display at the show had a wire around it to keep it from getting lost, which then meant you couldn't push it all the way in to then pull it out so this might be different when you can.

Under the hood of this device there is a 1.3GHz processor and 1GB of RAM, which doesn't seem like a lot of power for a device like this but we didn't notice too much lag. You'll also find 8GB of internal storage, also not a lot, but it can be expanded through the microSD slot.

It's 3G only, which is also a little disappointing but there is a 13-megapixel rear snapper, 1.3-megapixel front camera and a 3000mAh removable battery on board that made us a little happier. We didn't get a chance to test the camera or battery out but if we get it in for review, we will be sure to do so.

Overall, the LG G3 Stylus design is nice and fits in well with the LG G3 family despite looking a little less premium than the other devices. We would loved to have seen some more competitive specs but as LG is aiming for Brazil, Asia, the Middle East, Africa and CIS, as well as wanting to keep it cheap and cheerful, we understand that flagship specs weren't the plan for this device and it seems to do a good job at being a mid-range handset that offers stylus functionality.