This potato salad is worth $35,000, thanks to Kickstarter frenzy

People have used crowdfunding to raise money for nifty things like films and apps. And now one guy is using it to make potato salad.

We're not kidding. A new Kickstarter project - simply called Potato Salad - has a campaign goal of $10 has almost made $35,000. Zack Brown, the creator of the project, listed his campaign on 3 July with the following description: "I'm making potato salad. Basically I'm just making potato salad. I haven't decided what kind yet."

Although there are 25 days left in the funding period, more than 3,000 backers have already donated. Anyone who pledged $2 will receive a photo of Brown making the salad, while a pledge of $3 will get backers an actual bite of the potato salad along with a photo of Brown making the salad and a "thank you" note posted on the campaign website. At the bottom of the Kickstarter page, Brown warned: "It might not be that good. It's my first potato salad."

Due to the project's overwhelming success, Brown has added several (and rather humorous) stretch goals. He promised to throw a pizza party if the campaign reached $75, and he would try two different salad recipes if the campaign reached $100. At $300, Brown said he'd call a chef to get a better recipe. And at $350, he said he'd make "way more potato salad and probably do a third recipe."

Brown even answered questions about Potato Salad during an Ask Me Anything discussion on Reddit yesterday. He claimed he never thought the campaign would be this successful: "I think the thing people are responding to is the opportunity to come together around something equal parts absurd and mundane. Potato Salad isn't controversial, but it seems to unite us all," he said.

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It's unclear if Kickstarter will eventually end Potato Salad. That said, Kickstarter announced in June that it was trying a "simpler, friendlier" approach. The website said it would allow all types of campaigns going forward, as long as the projects aren't illegal or dangerous. It also doesn't hand-approve campaigns before they go live, though it can still shut them down. The website, for instance, use to nix "fund my lifestyle"-type projects.

Because Kickstarter is more hands-off nowadays, Potato Salad has been able to slip by and raise thousands in just a few days. What's next? We think $3 for a bite of cheesecake sounds good.