Situ Smart Food Nutrition Scale lets you track exactly what you’re eating

Situ, in its simplest form, is a weighing scale attached to an iPad app which lets users track the nutritional content of their food. But the level of detail and clarity of design go above and beyond that, making it a great way to lose weight, eat healthy, bulk up, or just track diet.

Situ is currently seeking funding on Kickstarter and, in 48 hours, has already passed the halfway mark to its £30,000 goal. The scale and app will allow users to place an item of food down to read out the weight, calories, fat, protein, carbohydrate content and more. This allows for a balanced and accurate measure of what is being eaten on a daily basis.

The app has a clear layout using pictures with drag-and-drop controls for ease. Users can even save regularly eaten foods to quickly select them when weighing.

Place a plate on the scale, hit the zero-out button, then add a slice of bread. Go into the bread section and select the type before being told the nutritional value, then click add to select. For every new item hitting zero-out on the scale is needed before placing it on the plate. This lets users add and subtract from a meal to meet goals. For measures like spices and oils there is another selection menu that can be pulled out from the side, then pinching in or out selects the amount.

Calorie goals can be set to keep track of a diet. Individual nutritional levels can be changed. For example the daily protein limit can be manually increased for a body builder. Or salt intake can be kept small for someone who requires a low sodium diet.

Situ is a great idea. While meal preparation will take a little longer it gives users control over what they're eating, potentially making dieting easier and leading to a healthier lifestyle. If Situ does well perhaps it will even become cross compatible with already established life trackers and their apps. This is the kind of thing we could see Samsung snapping up to add to its S Health suit.

Situ is, at the time of publishing, available to early adopters for £50.

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