Twitter's iOS app tests new design, and it's similar to the profile changes tested for web

Apart from new photo-tagging capabilities, it appears Twitter's mobile app has received another significant - though quiet - update.

The Next Web has discovered a design update in the Twitter for iOS app that's similar to the Facebook/Google+/Pinterest-like changes Twitter began testing on the web in February. This update is being rolled out to some users as a test, so not everyone will have access to the changes.

READ: Twitter now allows photo tagging of up to 10 people

According to The Next Web's screenshots, the new design features a profile picture in front of a white background on the left side of the screen. The cover photo is up at the top, and bio info is below the profile picture. Previously, a profile picture was centered, and you'd access a user's bio with a left swipe. The new look also added two new feeds to the profile area: one feed shows embedded photo tweets, while the other shows favorited tweets.

In February, Twitter's website began testing a new look. The most noticeable change in the redesign - by far - was the timeline. Tweets no longer ran vertically in a single column. Twitter instead assembled tweets in a card-like or tile-style layout. The interface was very similar to Pinterest, and it placed a stronger focus on photos and content.

READ: Twitter's website tests new redesign with Pinterest-like timeline

Other changes on the web included blow-up cover photos at the top of profiles, resembling Google+. And below cover photos you could find familiar tabs like tweets, photos/videos, following, followers, favourites, and lists. Echoing Facebook, profile pictures in the redesign were larger and located on the right. Additional bits like bio information, who to follow, trends and more were also on the right.

We've contacted Twitter for a comment to see if the circulating redesign in its mobile app is legit. Keep in mind that Twitter typically tests new features and design changes on a select few users before expanding updates to include everyone. There's a chance the new mobile design might never launch for all users.



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