Facebook has reached the ripe old age of ten. That's a decade of Likes, status updates, photo clicking and accepting friend requests. But it's been so much more than just that. 

Read on for a look at the most famous moments from the biggest social network on the planet.

While Facebook didn't officially appear on GTA V a company called Lifeinvader that's run by a bunch of geeks, shows your life digitally and is a startup, shares too many similarities to ignore.

Similar to Facebook's "Like" button, Lifeinvader lets users "stalk" people. There's even an easter egg in the form of GTA IV's Niko Bellic's Lifeinvader profile, viewable on Jimmy's laptop screen.

READ: GTA V: Middle class pursuits to take your mind off the killing

Apparently there's even a Lifeinvader tablet to be found somewhere in the game which doubles as a flashlight and allows users to "dock" with other users' social network profiles.

Before streaming your shows over the internet was cool Facebook was ahead of the game. In this case the good old game itself, football.

Facebook aired a live stream of the Extra Preliminary Round FA Cup tie between Wembley FC and Langford FC. It went out on ESPN at the same time, but you had to pay to watch that one.

READ: FA Cup back on Facebook as opening match is live streamed - David Seaman, Ray Parlour and other stars to play

Former internationals David Seaman, Ray Parlour, Graeme Le Saux, Martin Keown, Claudio Caniggia and Brian McBride all played.

The game was aired as part of a Budweiser promotion so users watched it while on facebook.com/Budweiseruk

The Social Network was a 2010 film starring Jesse Eisenberg as Facebook creator Mark Zuckerberg. It told the story of Facebook's inception, creation and troubles growing to become what it is today (or was in 2010 at least).

READ: The Social Network cleans up at the Golden Globes

While it was a great film for making Facebook even more famous than it already was, many issues were tackled. Granted these were largely public in the from of legal battles anyway. But Zuckerberg was no longer the friendly world-helping geek everyone had seen him as before this film.

Giving away all your data was probably a bad move by Facebook. At the time about 16 per cent of a poll group quit Facebook and 60 per cent were considering it after the privacy issue. Facebook introduced complex privacy settings that seemed to baffle users into giving away their personal information - likely lining Zuckerberg's pockets more with advertising funding.

READ: Zuckerberg admits Facebook privacy controls "missed the mark"

It's hard to imagine Facebook once had no Privacy Centre in the options. For a while it looked like this could undo the company, especially with Twitter on the up at the time. But, as ever, it sailed on through.

The HTC First was the official Facebook mobile phone. It was famous for this reason and because of how huge a flop it turned out to be. 

The handset, unfortunately for Facebook, was troubled by its Facebook Home UI which was too much of a shock for most to want. Plus users can get Facebook Home anywhere if they really want it - which they apparently don't.

Then there's the hardware, it's not bad, but coming out at the same time HTC had the One on the market, this didn't stand a chance. On top of all this AT&T had the handset exclusively and decided to drop the price from $99 to 99c in the first month of sales last year - the equivalent of slapping a FAIL stamp on the phone's screen. 

READ: HTC First review

Perhaps the phone was timed badly, perhaps the skin was too invasive. Whatever the reason this was a famous and embarrassing time for Facebook, who has stuck to software ever since. 

The social giant flashed $1 billion and Instagram was a goner. Expect it wasn't. Facebook bought the photo sharing website and app platform but continued to keep it running as normal - only making simultaneous sharing on both Facebook and Instagram easier. 

This was a large price to pay but with the growing popularity of Instagram and the drop in Facebook users it was probably a good move when it happened back in 2012. 

When Facebook became a public company the hype about buying shares was huge. The company was valued at a whopping $104 billion with shares at just $38 each. This value dropped by almost 50 per cent in the following months. 

Now share prices are doing better at $68 per share, and with the announcement of the Facebook Paper app there's been another spike. Not all bad then Facebook.

Here's to another 10 years, making the jump to our faces in Google Glass, and appearing in the next GTA. Until then enjoy Facebook's tenth birthday present to everyone: Look Back - a video of your life on Facebook so far.