Google Chromebooks account for 21 per cent of notebook sales

Google's Chromebook platform performed better than expected in 2013.

The cheap notebooks running Chrome OS, priced around $200, now claim 21 per cent of all notebook sales, according to research group NDP.

The rise came in 2013. Chrome OS made up 0.2 per cent of the computer and tablet market last year, but as of November, it is now 10 per cent. With Christmas sales set to be tallied early next year, the number is expected to rise even further.  

Chromebooks can be seen as a great option for first time computer users or the market that don't need the power of Windows and full-spec'd Intel machine - notebooks that once dominated the market. Essentially, a Chromebook allows a user to access the Internet on the cheap.

Read: Samsung Series 3 Chromebook 303C review

As Chromebooks hit more stores and are talked up in the media, the attraction among customers is increasing.

"We think that the top line reason for this happening is that the PC market is in the throes of pretty significant change," NPD analyst Stephen Baker said in July. "A few years ago, basically everything had to be Wintel products, but that's changed and consumers have changed along with it." 

Amazon saw the popularity of Chromebooks during the Christmas shopping season. Friday the company said the Samsung Chromebook and Acer Chromebook were the first and third most popular laptops sold during the holiday season, with Asus' Transformer notebook running Windows falling in between.

The Consumer Electronics Show in early January is typically a hot destination for new Chromebooks. Asus' roadmap in 2014 has indicated it will launch a Chromebook, presumably at the trade show. Asus CEO Shen said the company wanted to broaden its reach outside the realm of Windows-based laptop.

Traditional Chromebook players like Acer, Samsung and HP may unveil new machines as well, to kick off the Chromebook platform in 2014. 



>