Microsoft Bing It On campaign targets 'habitual' Brits

Microsoft's Bing it On campaign has launched in the UK, giving Brits the chance to use Bingiton.com, which launched in the US last year, and compare Bing’s search results to Google’s.

Microsoft conducted a survey recently and found the UK is a habitual nation and that Brits presumably use Google by default out of habit. The same survey showed 90 per cent of respondents would break their habit if showed a new experience.

Hence why Microsoft has launched the Bing It On campaign in the UK.  The hope - for Microsoft, at least - is that Brits will see there is not a big enough difference between Bing and Google. Even better, they might end up preferring Bing over Google.

UK consumers can visit Bingiton.com today, search a query and then view "unbranded results" from both search engines on the left and right sides. From there, they can choose either result they want or choose a draw if they cannot decide. After five rounds, the website reveals which search engine results were preferred.

“Our research reveals that a huge number of British people do things out of habit, and we believe one of those things is using Google by default," said Brian Kealy, head of search for Microsoft UK. "We’ve made huge strides with Bing in recent years and Bing is a genuine challenger to just ‘Googling’ it."

Microsoft also conducted another survey -  but this time on 1,000 people who used Bingiton.com. The company found that 53 per cent of consumers chose Bing. Only 34 per cent preferred Google and the remaining 13 per cent couldn’t decide.

Yale University law professor Ian Ayres doesn't buy Microsoft's claim that users prefer Bing to Google, so he recently challenged Microsoft's 1,000-people survey, which was conducted by independent research company Answers Research. A Yale team found that 53 per cent of users actually chose Google. Only 41 per cent preferred Bing.

Still, Kealy stands by Bingiton.com: "We’re confident in the quality of Bing’s results and we believe many people will be surprised by the outcome of the challenge," he added.



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