Google+ to fix YouTube's messy comment system

YouTube is amazing, but its comment system...not so much.

Google plans to change that. The company revealed on Tuesday that it is to introduce new YouTube comments powered by Google+ starting this week. Before we get into how Google+ will fix YouTube's messy comments, it's important to point out that Google has long tried to link Google+ and YouTube.

Why? Many have dubbed Google+ a ghost-town social network, and the best way for Google to make Google+ appear like a more active social network is to tap into YouTube's vast active user base. By making YouTube comments powered by Google+, Google is essentially killing two birds with one stone.

The switch will fix YouTube's comment system, which shows the most recent comments rather than the most important, and will simultaneously bolster Google+ activity and engagement. The company did something similar to this in 2012 when it began inviting YouTubers to abandon their YouTube handles and adopt full names (via Google+ Profile identities) instead. 

Read: @Horse_ebooks and Pronunciation Book revealed: It's run by humans after all

The ability to use full names on YouTube squelched anonymity on the web, and it encouraged YouTubers to join Google+. After all, YouTubers had to join Google+ to start using their full names on YouTube. Flash-forward more than a year later and Google has decided to integrate YouTube and Google+ even further through comments.

The update to YouTube comments will arrive for all videos later this year, and Google has described the transition as a way to "connect with familiar faces on YouTube". In a nutshell: Google said you’ll see posts at the top of the comment list from the video’s creator, popular personalities, engaged discussions about the video and people in your Google+ Circles.

YouTubers will be able to keep their comments (or conversations) on YouTube either public or private, and popular YouTube vloggers or YouTube channels will be able to enjoy new moderating capabilities. The new comment system offers tools for reviewing comments before they’re live, blocking certain words or auto-approving comments from specified YouTubers.

While the entire thing probably has a deeper intent, the point is users should find YouTube comments powered by Google+ more relevant and easier to follow. So, bravo to that - right?