iPhone 5S and 5C launch day: Pictures from the Apple Store London queue

It's that day again, the masses have come out to queue for the new iPhone, and we, the press have queued to take photos of them queueing. So we ask you: who is more crazy? The queuers, or the queuers who queue to photograph the queuers.

It was all pretty much the same as always down Regent Street way; the queue was an impressive length.

To keep the police and Westminster Council happy, the waiting crowds were kept mostly down the side streets and in a park, along with some portable lavatories that would probably make the ones at festivals blush from a cleanliness perspective. There was a lot of rubbish too, and cardboard which had been placed on the ground to keep bottoms warm as they waited through the night. It's certainly impressive that Apple has managed to make the homeless lifestyle cool. Although most homeless people don't have the advantage of free Starbucks coffee to keep them going.

Read: In the Regent Street Apple iPhone 5S queue: "I've been offered £7,000 for my space"

As we walked the queue, most people had been told they would be able to buy a phone, but stocks of the gold and silver editions were limited, and most people wouldn't be getting one beyond those quite far forward. Most of the people emerging first from the shop had bought a couple of gold 5Ss, presumably because they'll sell well on eBay, although one chap was heard to say he was going to keep both of his phones - he was 17.

Nobody came out brandishing an iPhone 5C.

Read: iPhone 5C sales won't break any records on day one, but it's all about the long game

Interestingly, person number one in the queue was not the first person to emerge. Our photos show two guys, and they were number two and three in the original queue. Most of the assembled press missed them come out, only to realise as they were walking off. Pocket-lint was nearly shoved to the ground by a photographer whose whole life seemed to depend on taking a photo of someone holding a box.

Still, the news teams who missed the first two people out were happy, because they said, "Oh, he wasn't number one". Perhaps more striking though, was just how many of the first people out didn't want to be interviewed. Some covered their faces with coats, others just politely declined to be interviewed by the TV news crews, and others walked off ignoring the fuss that was made.

Of course, some people loved it, and several held their new phone aloft, as if in tribute to Jobs himself, and as everything settled down, we remembered that there will be a new iPad soon, and we can start this all over again.



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