iPhone 5S can tell if you're walking, running or driving; soon can locate your car

Cupertino-based Apple has provided more details on the power of its M7 processor found inside the iPhone 5S, following its media event on Tuesday. On its website, Apple lists several use cases for the motion processor as app developers and the company itself begin to tinker with the new technology.

Apple says the M7 processor will know when you're walking, running or driving. Using this tracking, Apple has embedded a feature in the Maps app to switch from driving to walking turn-by-turn navigation if you park your car and continue on foot.

Using the driving sensing on the M7, the iPhone 5S also won't ask to join Wi-Fi networks that it may pick-up while you're driving. And the iPhone 5S can tell when you're asleep (because your phone won't move for a while), so it will stop pinging the cellular network in hopes of not draining battery life.

The M7 motion coprocessor gathers data from the accelerometer, gyroscope and compass of the iPhone 5S, taking such work away from the A7 processor for a more streamlined approach. Apple has opened up CoreMotion APIs up for developers to better build fitness and activity apps.

Following the launch of iOS 7 on 20 September, we suspect it won't be too much longer for M7 supporting apps to flood the App Store.

During Apple's keynote on Tuesday Phil Schiller, senior vice-president of worldwide marketing, unveiled the Nike+ Move app. It takes advantage of the M7 processor to offer a FuelBand-like experience right from the phone.

"The Nike+ Move App is an introductory experience of NikeFuel wherever you carry the new iPhone 5S," Nike said in a statement. "It calculates how active you are and uses NikeFuel to motivate you and your friends to move more. The Nike+ ecosystem - led by Nike+ Running, Nike+ FuelBand and the Nike+ FuelBand App - includes features and functionality far beyond what the introductory Nike+ Move App delivers."

Interestingly, Apple is developing a feature using the M7 processor to help you find where your car is parked, according to 9to5mac. When you arrive at your destination, the iPhone is said to register your car’s location through the Maps app. When it's time to find your car, the Maps app will be launched to take you right to it.