Samsung shows off three printer concepts, including one made of cardboard

Samsung has devised three design concepts for new laser printers that have been recognised by the International Design Excellence Awards 2013. And one is made from folded cardboard.

The Samsung Origami has come about as a direct result of considering how much paper is used in the printing process, and how much of an effect that has on the environment. Designers Min-chul Kim, Sang-in Lee and Seung-wook Jeong decided that using recycled paper for the outer shell of the printer, therefore, is one way to use some of the materials otherwise wasted. It also cuts down on the amount of plastics created for a conventional machine and can even be recycled back to paper at the end of its life.

It is called Origami because the end user will build the casing themselves, through in-depth instructions printed on the cardboard.

Sadly, this particular concept is unlikely to go into production, but at least one of the other prototypes could.

Clip has similar interior parts, but its shell is made from compressed polyethylene plastic that simply clips together, an action that can be performed by the consumer. There are no screws or parts to glue and Samsung believes this would cut down the cost to the buyer by up to 10 per cent.

"There's no barrier for production," Samsung's senior designer Juehyun Jung told Wired. "After a few engineering problems are solved, it can be offered about 10 per cent cheaper, compared to other products in same segment."

The last model has been designed for users to customise their printer to suit its environment. Mate is comprised of differently sized modular panels which come in a variety of colours. The user can then choose different colour schemes for different parts of the printer, and swap and change as they see fit.