LG G2 pictures and hands-on

After numerous rumours and official teases from LG itself, the LG G2 has been announced and it sits proudly at the top of the Korean manufacturer's Android smartphone range.

It boasts a mighty set of specifications, enough to not only put the phone in the same category as Samsung's Galaxy S4 and the HTC One but slightly above. That's mainly thanks to the inclusion of Qualcomm's top-of-the-line mobile chipset, with a 2.26GHz quad-core Snapdragon 800 processor and Adreno 330 graphics.

In real terms, they give the G2 a hell of a lot of oomph in the boiler room. We've been impressed by numerous demonstrations of the Snapdragon 800 since we first saw it at CES in January and doubt we've even viewed half of its talents. Needless to say, when we get much more time with the LG flagship phone we'll be hoping to find out more. It is capable of viewing and recording 4K video and outputting 7.1 surround sound. That's "wow" enough for us for now.

Also helping in the speed stakes is a healthy 2GB of RAM on board, so multitasking and performing general smartphone functions are both smooth as a swimmer's legs.

Another initial stand-out feature is the phone's 5.2-inch 1920 x 1080 True HD IPS+ display. Although some may bemoan the absence of an AMOLED panel, others will cite the odd, almost greenish tinge of the alternative technology and you do get a whopping 423ppi to ensure that images are as crisp as you could possibly want on a smartphone.

And then, of course, there is the volume rocker on the rear. While nice and of some use, it does feel a little gimmicky, but no more so than the headlining features other manufacturers often wheel out during new phone launches. It's certainly better than gesture controls and will get some use.

In the hand, the LG G2 feels similar to other high-end handsets from peers, but slightly larger. At 138.5 x 70.9 x 8.9mm it is a touch bigger and fatter than the SGS4, for example, but has a tiny bezel around the screen so looks sleek. It certainly feels nice if a bit plasticky, but no more so than many rivals. The Corning Gorilla Glass 3 on the front should protect it from harm.

In camera terms, it's hard to get a real impression during a hands-on session at a press event, so we'll leave that for a full review. The fact that it has a 13-megapixel sensor is nice, but we really need to test it in different circumstances. The 2.1-megapixel front-facing cam does a decent job too, but the same rules apply.

So, initial impressions are good. Great, even. And it's nice to see that LG is willing to bring a flagship phone to the UK for the first time in an age. And one with a healthy 3,000mAh battery, to boot.

It will also be LTE in the UK, so 4G compatible for the new networks as well as EE. And with NFC on board, contactless payments will work too.

We just can't wait to get the LG G2 into the full Pocket-lint test labs now.



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