Razer Blade 14-inch gaming laptop pictures and hands-on

The Razer Blade 14 unhinges the typical gaming laptop concept: this slender 14-inch slab is far smaller and thinner than a typical gaming laptop but doesn't hold back on the power or specification. Pocket-lint was on hand at the E3 gaming expo in Los Angeles, California, where we spent some time with the Razer Blade 14.

Isn't it a lovely looker? Play at home, play on the go, just play. The Razer Blade is a less than 17mm thick when closed and when the screen is lifted up it's such a thin panel that it could be mistaken for a razor blade, ableit a smooth one that's happy to be handled in the hands. Apt naming, eh?

Under the hood is a fourth-gen Intel Core i7 and Nvidia GeForce GTX 765M graphics card with 2GB of its own GDDR5 RAM. Add in 8GB of DDR3L (1600Mhz) system RAM and a 128GB SSD - which is expandable to 256GB or 512GB in the yet pricier models - and everything loads up super fast load.

If anything is missing then it's HD resolution: instead the Razer Blade 14 pushes a 1600 x 900 pixel resolution into its 14-inch LED-backlit panel. It's bright and certainly looks great but, c'mon Razer, gamers want eye-watering HD resolution - particularly when there's so much power under the hood.

Apart from that bump in the road we think the Razer Blade 14 is a stunner. The build quality is sublime, complete with an emerald green backlit keyboard and smooth aluminium shell. Our only moan is that it does attract fingerprints rather easily, so anyone lucky enough to purchase one will most likely want to keep it like a prized possession. Those seeking that bit more may want to look to the model's bigger brother, the 17-inch Blade Pro, which comes complete with quick-fire macro keys and side-aligned LCD trackpad that lacks in the smaller Blade 14 model.

READ: Razer Blade Pro first play: Pictures and hands-on

Prior to the Blade 14's unveiling, Razer ran a teaser ad which coined the line "thinner than a dime". Obviously we don't use US currency here in the UK, but the monetary-sized equivalent would be a five pence piece standing upright on its side - the Blade 14 is thinner than that.

But it's nowhere nearly as budget. Take that 5p and multiply it 23,000 times and you'll be close to the Blade 14's $1,799 start price. Only problem is our British Sterling is next to useless when it comes to Razer - the company, at present, only ships its models within the US and Canada. When we quizzed why, the response was simple: "We can't make them fast enough". Sounds like a new factory is needed because we want to see Razer in the UK.