Xbox One Reveal breaks viewership records, suggests strong TV interest?

Microsoft announced on Tuesday that the Xbox Reveal event from last week broke records and topped 8.45 million viewers within the first 24 hours of streaming.

The company clarified in a press release that Xbox.com viewership almost tripled its previous concurrency record, "with almost three times as many people watching the livestream at the same time, versus any other major event in Xbox.com history".

Akamai, Microsoft's streaming partner, further claimed the Xbox Reveal doubled peak traffic records and was "among the most watched live broadcasts delivered", as it beat concurrent records set by the 2010 World Cup, Royal Wedding in 2011 and 2012 election night.

Nielsen also reported more than 1.73 million people watched the event's briefing on SPIKE TV and that it was the No 1 television show for males ages 18-34 at 10am on 21 May. With such huge viewing figures for the Xbox Reveal, one cannot help wonder if people will also be keen to watch television on the new Xbox One.

Read: TV on the Xbox One: Microsoft explains its plans

Microsoft's Xbox One is likely to be a hit gaming platform, but the company also wants to push its home entertainment capabilities. Moreover, with the attention of nearly 9 million people, plus a little determination, hardware and money, it might just have a chance.

Microsoft has explained that it sees some television content being delivered over the internet, but it also has plans to commission its own TV shows, as evident by Steven Spielberg's Halo live action TV show that will air on the platform. However, the Xbox One has features that extend beyond gaming. It is chiefly designed to toggle between playing games and cable television, where as previous gaming consoles could only play games, so it is essentially a feature-loaded machine ready and able to take on the TV.

Read: Microsoft's patent application envisions awards for watching TV

Microsoft wants the Xbox One to be the focus of everybody's living room, and a recent patent application published by the US Patent and Trademark Office is even more proof that the company is thinking outside of the box when it comes to envisioning a product future brimming with TV-related functions. 

An example described in the patent includes awarding achievements to viewers who watched a single show or series of a single show. Viewers would earn their achievements similar to how gamers now earn rewards on the Xbox 360, but the patent does not specify in which platform - whether the Xbox One or even Windows - the technology would land. 

As for the current state of Xbox One, Microsoft admitted on Tuesday that there were still "unanswered questions and a desire for more information on Xbox One." The company promised more details would come in the weeks ahead at E3 in June.