Adobe Photoshop Express now available for Windows 8 and RT

There are some really good apps for Windows 8 now, but they are still the exception, rather than the rule. Happily, Adobe has launched Photoshop Express to help increase the numbers of useful programmes for Windows 8 and RT users.

The app, which is free with some "premium" content available as in-app purchases, gives users the opportunity to tweak their pictures on a tablet or PC running Windows. While it works on desktops, it's probably fair to say it's not really aimed at these computers, and the interface - like all Windows 8/RT apps - is very much designed to be used with touch.

Some of the effects and tweaks are free. Certainly, the ones you're likely to use to get an image looking good are accessible without charge. You do have to pay when you want to use the premium "looks" as they are known. These are essentially batch image tweaks that give your photos a very specific style. The premium "looks" are £2.19 for 20.

There's also a noise-reduction filter with two modes of adjustment. These allow you to tweak the noise in both luminance (brightness) and colour. This pack is a further £3.50 to add on. The nice touch is that you can preview how these work before you buy; we found this quite handy, and to be honest none of the extra filters really tempted us. Tablet users might really enjoy them if they make use of their tablet camera though.

Images can be loaded from your tablet or PCs storage, taken by an attached camera or webcam or taken from Adobe's cloud-based Revel service. The latter allows you to sync your photos across multiple devices and will again work well for tablet users. Taking a photo with the app is easy enough too, just select that option then tap the screen when you're ready, the image will be taken and you can either use it, or reshoot.

We haven't spent ages looking at the app, but from what we have seen, the image tweaks are the sort of thing that would be quite handy to have. Auto fix does a good job of tweaking your photos, and the "looks" aren't bad, although we can honestly live without all that Instagram-type nonsense.



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