Scientists invent glow in the dark sheep and no, it isn't 1 April

A laboratory in Uruguay has developed glow-in-the-dark sheep by genetically modifying their genes with that of the fluorescent Aequarea jellyfish.

Yes, we are as stunned as you about this one. The sheep, which are clearly visible at night, have a distinct phosphorescent glow, which isn't unlike that of the jellyfish they share their genes with.

The nine fluorescent lambs were born in October last year. They were produced by the Pasteur Institute and raised in the Animal Reproduction Institute of Uruguay.

Short of glowing-in-the-dark, these sheep are totally normal in every other way. Why exactly they need to glow in the dark we can't be sure, although we imagine it would making finding them at night quite easy.

You might remember we ran a story on glow in the dark popcorn this April Fool's Day. That was a bit of fun, this is for real.



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