BlackBerry results: 1 million Z10s shipped, but 33,000 customers leaving every day

BlackBerry's latest results are in and it's not good reading. The company managed to ship one million  BlackBerry Z10 handsets to customers, mainly in the UK, but only a further 5 million BlackBerry smartphones in the same 90 days around the rest of the world and just 370,000 BlackBerry PlayBook tablets.

The figures which don't include the US launch of BlackBerry Z10 or the launch of the Q10, which is still to come, show that while there was some appetite for the new operating system, BlackBerry still has a long way to go before it gets back on track. 

Breaking that done in terms of revenue, the UK accounted for almost half of the company's income with 45.8 per cent compared to North America on 21.9 per cent, Latin America on 19.1 per cent and Asia Pacific with 14.1 per cent.

In more troubling news, that lack of excitement for the new device meant that that the company lost 3 million subscribers over the last quarter as its customers ventured elsewhere to get its phone fix. BlackBerry says it has 76 million subscribers, down from 79 million last quarter, and 80 million the quarter before. 

BlackBerry has previously stated that 50 per cent of those that bought the Z10 were Android and iPhone users, implying the new phone isn't enough to save the company's mass exodus. 

"We have implemented numerous changes at BlackBerry over the past year and those changes have resulted in the company returning to profitability in the fourth quarter," said Thorsten Heins, president and CEO of BlackBerry.

"With the launch of BlackBerry 10, we have introduced the newest and what we believe to be the most innovative mobile computing platform in the market today. Customers love the device and the user experience, and our teams and partners are now focused on getting those devices into the hands of BlackBerry consumer and enterprise customers."

The company made a total of $94 million in profit on sales of $2.9 billion. 

The company also announced that Mike Lazaridis had decided to retire as vice-chair and a director, cutting his ties with the company he help found 30 years ago.