In addition to Toshiba's 4K Series 9 tellies, the company has unveiled a host of other new televisions for 2013, including its top-spec 1080p Series 7 models.

Available in 40, 50 and 58-inch screen sizes the Series 7 TVs are a far cry from some of the chunky edged Toshiba tellies of old. The trim bezel with rounded corners is soft on the eye, while the industrial-like brushed-aluminium stand makes for a centrepiece, even if the single cylindrical hold doesn't keep the TV particularly steady if touched.

We've seen each size of Series 7 model on display running Disney and Man of Steel showreels to best effect, though we've not yet been able to see how these edge-LED LCD sets perform in true dim conditions. We did think there was a notable presence of noise within the samples, but this could be on account of the source material - something to investigate more fully in the future when final units are available.

We weren't able to see any 3D footage, but Toshiba's Series 7 sets support active shutter glasses technology for 3D display.

Just like the Series 9 4K TVs, another element that Toshiba was keen to push with the Series 7 (as well as Series 4 and Series 6 models below) is the introduction of its Cloud TV and Wi-Fi service. This concept merges apps, twitter feeds, personalised logins, and even a Rovi-powered search mechanism that can fish-out associated metadata from all accessible online apps as well as localised content.

The only problem is that it won't find data that's not available: including, according to the Toshiba representative, HDMI-input from, say, a Sky box and closed apps that don't release data to the cloud.

Netflix, Vimeo, Blinkbox, iPlayer, Skype and plenty more big apps are on board which bolsters the Toshiba selection, but there's still no sign of LoveFilm.

We're yet to hear official prices, but we're told that the 58-incher ought to retail for around £1,199 when it goes on sale in the summer.

Sections Toshiba Televisions
Mike Lowe

Gaming geek, semi-failed cyclist, big screen and movie lover and fan of both big beats and beer. As the former Reviews Editor at What Digital Camera, self-confessed camera geek Mike has seen pretty much every digital camera that's been made. His work has featured in a variety of well-respected titles, including Wired, TechRadar, Professional Photographer and many more.

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