Android head moves on, replaced by Chrome lead, what's next for Google?

Google's Andy Rubin is no longer in charge of Android. As revealed in a blog post earlier today from Larry Page, Sundar Pichai is to replace Rubin as leader of Android. 

This is a big deal, as it was Rubin who worked wonders with Android, helping transform it to what it is today. As Larry Page explains: "Sergey and I first heard about Android back in 2004, when Andy Rubin came to visit us at Google. He believed that aligning standards around an open-source operating system would drive innovation across the mobile industry.

"Most people thought he was nuts. But his insight immediately struck a chord because at the time it was extremely painful developing services for mobile devices. We had a closet full of more than 100 phones and were building our software pretty much device by device. It was nearly impossible for us to make truly great mobile experiences." 

Rubin's streamlining of Android has worked wonders for the mobile industry and helped make companies like Samsung what they are today. 

Sundar Pichai, his replacement, has previously been senior vice-president of Chrome, Google Apps and Android. Pichai's work at Google has been connected mostly with developing and pushing things like Chrome OS and the Chrome browser, so this could have a big influence on the direction Android takes.

"Today Chrome has hundreds of millions of happy users and is growing fast thanks to its speed, simplicity and security," said Page. "So while Andy’s a really hard act to follow, I know Sundar will do a tremendous job doubling down on Android as we work to push the ecosystem forward." 

Could this mean Chrome and Android will merge? Very possibly. As for Rubin, he will remain at Google, but exactly what he will be doing is yet to be announced. 

In the near future, the chances are Android won't change drastically, simply because the likes of Key Lime Pie are probably already nearing final stages of development. Pichai's appointment however could mean a big change for Android in the future, but how remains to be seen.

 



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