APP OF THE DAY: Kings Can Fly review (iPhone)

Puzzle games float our boat or, as is more the case with Kings Can Fly, fly our red-ballooned airships. Ahem. Firedroid Games's three-dimensional puzzler is not only rather glorious to look at,  but it will also get those brain cogs gloriously turning too.

Kings Can Fly

Format
iOS | Android
Price
£1.49 (iOS) | £0.69 (Android)
Where
iTunes | Google Play

The concept of the game is simple: It's your job to build directional fans to harness the power of the wind and fly the King's airships back home safely. We're not totally sure why the man in charge has chosen to take the difficult path, but it wouldn't be much of a game otherwise.

There are over 60 levels shared across a mixture of visual environments, each of which can be fully navigated through its 3D form by a combination of single-finger motion and double-finger pinch action on the smartphone's screen. This open navigation both looks impressive and makes it easier to solve levels - whether you're a top-down or three-quarter-view kind of person.

To begin with the levels are super easy, but things get more complex and tougher to solve in no time. Sometimes the most-direct route isn't the best, as airships will collide into one another, while some seemingly easy-looking levels may cause some chin-stroking until - boom - everything clicks and you're ready to launch.

Add a smattering of whirlwinds, mountains to jump over using limited tools for the solution and extra thought is often required. If you misplace a fan then it's no problem to relocate or delete it by clicking on it to bring up a menu.

The pace of the game is, well, it's at your own pace. It's not like Lemmings where a continual onslaught of on-screen sprites often requires quick action. Nope, Kings Can Fly is all about pre-planning: set up a route and only then push the release button to watch the ships fly. Rigour required.

To some that may sound slow, but we like its structure a lot. The pace makes it a great game to dip in and out of. It's kept us occupied on short bus journey commutes and beyond - it's engaging enough to keep you pulled in to finish up "just one more level".

Kings is a simple concept of a puzzler but delivered in style that really soars.



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