Porn is so easy to find on Vine, will it be lifted from App Store?

Since Twitter's video capture application Vine was released for iPhone last week, plenty of users have been looking for interesting ways to utilise its six-second clip taking. There are some clever short animations, skilled cutting sequences and more. Oh, and of course there's porn. Lot's of it.

Naturally, put a camera in someone's hand and the ability to spread the results freely and without editorial filtering and you're bound to get a booby, nob or arse pop up. However, search for the hashtag "#porn" and you'll find so much more.

Users are filming each other, screens showing hardcore pornographic movies, the lot. And it's as easy to find as funny clips about sleeping cats. Indeed, one particular search term will intersperse one with the other.

To be fair, as reported by Business Insider, it's not really Vine's problem. Vine itself doesn't judge what is uploaded on to its servers and, therefore, sent out into the world. "You are responsible for your use of the services, for any content you post to the services, and for any consequences thereof," it states clearly in the terms and conditions of use.

"The content you submit, post, or display will be able to be viewed by other users of the services and through third-party services and websites. You should only provide content that you are comfortable sharing with others under these terms."

Read: Twitter's Instagram for video iPhone app, Vine, is here

In addition, in response to BI's question on uploaded porn, parent company Twitter said users could self-police the content they find. "Users can report videos as inappropriate within the product if they believe the content to be sensitive or inappropriate (eg, nudity, violence, or medical procedures)," it says. "Videos that have been reported as inappropriate have a warning message that a viewer must click through before viewing the video.

"Uploaded videos that are reported and determined to violate our guidelines will be removed from the site, and the user that posted the video may be terminated. Please review the Vine Rules (http://vine.co/terms) for more information on these violations."

This may be enough for some, but Apple may take a tougher stance. Apple has a strict policy on applications that allow access to graphic sexual content, having removed picture app 500px for allowing users to see pornographic images in a similar way to Vine.

But Business Insider points out that there are exceptions Apple has let slide: Google's Chrome browser and Twitter itself, for example. It's just as easy to gain access to pornography through those apps as it is for Vine. Although showing video or picture content is not their primary purpose, so this may prove to be a different case.

It will certainly be interesting to see what the Cupertino company will do about it. And, if it decides to remove the app, how Twitter will respond.

UPDATE: Vine remains on iTunes for now, but it's just potentially placed itself in further porn-flavoured hot water. A porn clip was posted as one of the Editor's Picks that appear on all users' home page.

BBC News reports that a posting appeared with a warning message that, once clicked on, revealed adult content. It was removed quickly, but not before social networks were awash with complaints.

One user, says the BBC, called Taylor Winkelmeyer (yes, we know), was none too pleased. "I clicked on the link because I thought the warning was a joke.

"I am furious I had to see something like this. Someone please tell me how to get it off my feed."