Haswell and Bay Trail: Intel's future processors detailed at CES

Intel has announced several new chip offerings at its CES press event in Las Vegas.

The company's latest Intel Core processor, dubbed Haswell, was among the event's highlights. The new chip, surely to make its way into several Windows 8-powered devices this year, is promised to feature all-day battery life for ultrabooks, at nine hours of continuous usage. 

The reference design shown off by Intel on stage was available in both i5/i7 architecture. Intel will require ultrabooks that use Haswell to be touch-enabled. 

The new quad-core 22nm Atom SoC processor called "Bay Trail", was also announced aimed at Windows 8 and Android tablets. 

Intel is calling it the most-powerful Atom processor to date, with more than twice the performance of its current tablet processor offerings. 

"With Bay Trail we will build on the work done with our current SoC development and accelerate very quickly by leveraging Intel's core computing strengths," Mike Bell, VP of the mobile and communications group, said. "We will take advantage of the tremendous software assets and expertise at our disposal to deliver the best products with best-in-class user experiences."

The Bay Trail processor can be implemented into devices as thin as 8mm. Intel is promising "all-day battery life and weeks of standby." It is set to be available by the fourth-quarter of 2013. 

Intel also announced a new processor targeted at developing nations dubbed "Lexington" at its press event. The Z2420 Atom chip was shown-off on a reference device packing a 1.2 GHz single-core processor with HyperThreading, and dual-SIM support.

Last, for ultrabooks and tablets, Intel announced a low-power versions of its Ivy Bridge processor operating at 7 watts. They're aimed at reducing the amount of battery life needed, along with enabling thinner and lighter devices. Intel says there are several designs in development.

Pocket-lint is on the scene in Las Vegas, covering the world's largest tech trade show with the amount of force you'd expect. You can check out our dedicated CES 2013 hub for all the latest news and hands-ons.