Apple iMac (2012) pictures and hands-on

Apple has revealed a new, thinner, sleeker iMac for those who still like to sit at a desk. Pocket-lint was at the San Jose Special Event to have a gander at the new computer first hand, along with only a handful of other journalists from the UK.

From the front you can't immediately see the changes Apple has made, but move the angle of your view and you'll soon see the difference.

The biggest change is that the new iMac takes on some of the design ethos of the old eMac from all those years ago, featuring a bulbous back plate that hides all the gubbins but tapers down to an incredibly thin 5mm edge.

That's achievable mainly because Apple has lost the optical disk drive from the side. Don't worry, there's an optional optical disk drive if you really must have one.

Back to the main focus of the iMac - the screen - and the IPS display itself is now 5mm thinner than before, and now laminated to the front glass in order to eliminate an air gap that was there previously. The result is a very crisp screen that you'll enjoy whether you've opted for the 27-inch or 21.5-inch model.]

It's worth pointing out that with the 21.5-inch model you won't be able to upgrade it to the way that the back is sealed, and even the 27-inch version only lets you swap out memory and nothing else. That's certainly something to factor in if you are buying one. Buy as powerful machine as possible now rather than believing you can upgrade later. 

A number of configurations will be available and start with 2.9GHz quad-core Intel i5 and 2.7GHz quad-core Intel i5 processors for the 27 and 21.5-inch models respectively. We didn't have that much time at the event to play with the iMac to see how it performs, but a quick whizz of the mouse and opening up some apps proved it to perform as we would expect.

Both models feature 8GB of RAM and a 1TB HDD, and graphics duties are handled by Nvidia cards; the GeForce GT 640M for the 21.5-inch (with a 1920 x 1080 resolution) and the GeForce GTX 660M for the 27-inch (2560 x 1440 pixels).

One optional extra (as well as an optical drive) is Apple's new Fusion Drive, a flash memory/HDD hybrid that speeds up some usage, such as boot time and a few pre-installed apps.

As standard, Apple will pre-install its applications on the Flash drive to speed up boot times, however it will learn which apps you use and switch them accordingly. 



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